Archives for category: Anime

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Blue Dragon is now backwards compatible on Xbox One.

Announced on Twitter today by Xbox Live’s Major Nelson, Blue Dragon has been a much-desired title for the console’s legacy support program and follows hot on the heels of Mistwalker’s other Xbox 360 exclusive jRPG Lost Odyssey, which hit Xbox One back compat a little over a month ago.

Like Lost Odyssey, Blue Dragon is a very traditionally-styled multi-disc Japanese RPG, though while Lost Odyssey hews closer to the Final Fantasy template, Blue Dragon feels more like that other juggernaut of the genre, Dragon Quest, right down to the designs by Akira Toriyama. Like Lost Odyssey and a few others, the game is currently disc-only as no digital version exists. Phil Spencer has commented that the BC are looking into making this possible, so we’ll have to wait and see if that happens. In the meantime, we can expect second hand prices to rise in response to the announcement.

This brings both of Mistwalker’s big Xbox exclusives to the current gen, both of which were part of Microsoft’s early push to try and make their console a success in Japan. The 360 saw a number of exclusive Japanese games in its early years, including Tales of Vesperia (which is absolutely the best jRPG of its generation and you should play it right now) and a few others, and it’s a shame that it’s a strategy that never really paid off. We’re certainly seeing the results of that now, as plenty of Japanese games are skipping the Xbox One, from smaller titles like the recently announced Danganronpa and Nonary collections all the way to larger publishers like Square Enix, who are skipping the console for games such as the upcoming NieR Automata.

No Automata :(

No Automata ;_;

I’d like to see Microsoft invest a bit more in Japanese games again – not necessarily to make inroads in Japan, because I don’t think anyone believes that’s even the remotest of possibilities now, but to diversify their line-up a bit. So far, we’ve only seen a collaboration with Yukio Futatsugi that resulted in a pale imitation of his cult favourite Panzer Dragoon series in Crimson Dragon, and the multi-team partnership that gave us ReCore, even if Keiji Inafune’s Comcept only really consulted while the US-based Armature handled development duties. Scalebound is yet to come, and I’m really looking forward to that, but I’d love to see Microsoft throw handfuls of cash at Hironobu Sakaguchi again to get something like Lost Odyssey made.

Still, one thing Microsoft do deserve massive amounts of kudos for is their support for backward compatibility. The catalogue grows every week, and in the last few months we’ve not only been given access to some big hitters, but others that weren’t performing quite so well have been updated to run even better than they did on native hardware. It feels like Team Xbox is really hitting its stride now with BC.

Announced at Square Enix’s Uncovered Final Fantasy XV event in Los Angeles, Brotherhood is a five-part anime miniseries that leads into the main game. We’d heard rumours of both a CG film and a new demo to be unveiled, both of which came true, but apparently no one saw this coming, so it was a surprise to say the least. In my write-up of that event, I talked about how Square Enix seems to be extremely bullish about Final Fantasy XV‘s prospects – creating a cross-media sub-series right off the bat surely signifies their confidence in the game’s success.

Brotherhood focuses on Noctis and his three chums Ignis, Gladio and Prompto and aims to give fans a closer look at these four young men and the bonds of friendship between them. Fans have long questioned whether they’ll be able to get behind these characters, pointing out that they look like a Korean boy band in matching clothing, so hopefully we’ll be able to get a good feel for them over the five episodes. With the first eleven-minute episode available to watch now, we decided to take a look.

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The series begins with a short flash-back scene, in which we see a young Noctis, bloodied and seemingly at death’s door thanks to an enormous sword-wielding snake monster. Luckily, he is saved by his father, King Regis, who appears with his glittering Phantom Swords and engages the beast. We soon join an adult Noctis, asleep in the Regalia as he and his friends make their way to Caem, and we learn that they’re on the run from Niflheim’s forces in the wake of the empire’s defeat of the Kingdom of Lucis and occupation of the Royal City. It seems that Noctis and his party were on their way to his impending wedding to Tenebrae’s Lunafreya Nox Fleuret when the Empire attacked, meaning they were out of the city when it fell. The Empire has told the world that all members of Lucis’ royal famiy were killed during the fighting, and they’re now hunting Noctis to make that lie a reality, sending Magitek soldiers to track him down.

As the four friends stop at a diner to grab some food, we sense that they’re at ease with one another, comfortable in each other’s presence despite Noctis’ royal blood. Ignis is a little stiffer than the rest, which is to be expected from his position as Noctis’ royal advisor, but Prompto – constantly hyperactive, taking pictures and wanting to play games – and Gladio – more laid back, confident – seem to enjoy engaging in a little friendly teasing when it comes to the Prince. Noctis himself is portrayed as a little immature; he’s rather unwilling to talk to his friends about his betrothed, Luna, and refuses to eat the salad in his burger, which both Gladio and Ignis gently chastise him for as he carefully extracts pieces of lettuce and tomato and discards them on poor Ignis’ plate. Given the circumstances he finds himself in, I’m sure we’ll see Noctis grow and mature somewhat across the following four episodes, though going by what we’ve seen of the game so far I wouldn’t be surprised to see him retain a hint of childish petulance.

Oh, Noctis...

Oh, Noctis…

Near the episode’s conclusion we’re treated to a nice battle scene, as Noctis and friends try to break through an imperial roadblock, and it’s a nicely-drawn scene, if a bit lacking in peril. It manages to showcase a number of Noctis’ abilities from the game, like his now-iconic Warp Strike, which he uses to stab a Magitek soldier in the head from extreme distance, as well as some of his other weaponry that materialises out of thin air and his almost ethereal dodging of enemy attacks. At one point we even see Noctis use Tempest, a wide-arcing Zweihander technique that you can use in last year’s Episode Duscae playable demo. For their part, the Empire’s Magitek soldiers don’t appear to pose much of a threat; they’re slow to react to Noctis and friends’ assault, and slow-moving and ineffective when they do.

These guys are pretty damn lethal in Episode Duscae, adept at punishing your mistakes and soaking up a ton of damage, but here they’re simply fodder: as the battle rages on, it becomes clear the empire have set a trap for our heroes. As a dropship thunders into the scene, dropping a reinforced metal crate onto the battlefield, out comes – you guessed it – that very same monster that nearly killed young Noctis years earlier. Consumed with anger, Noct charges the creature, sword in hand, and our first episode of Brotherhood ends on a cliffhanger.

It’s a good start to the series, with decent animation courtesy of A-1 Pictures, the studio behind Sword Art Online and Blue Exorcist. It does a good job of setting up our protagonists, offering a decent bit of interplay between them despite its brevity, and it’s nice to see that they’re all distinct enough to want to get to know them better. We have four more episodes to look forward to before the game releases, and it’ll be interesting to see how it leads into Final Fantasy XV itself. I’m certainly eager to find out. You can watch episode 1 of Brotherhood: Final Fantasy XV below.