Archives for category: BioWare

Note: this piece was written just after June’s E3 trade show. It turns out I’d forgotten to hit the publish button until now. Oops.

With the madness of E3 now over and all those glossy big-budget trailers still rattling around our heads, perhaps it’s time to take a brief look at some of the games that didn’t have the benefit of massive marketing budgets behind them at last week’s video game spectacular. This isn’t to say these games didn’t appear at E3 at all, of course – just that they didn’t get the limelight they might have deserved.

NieR Automata
NieR Automata's 2B
Announced last year to the absolute delight and disbelief of NieR fans everywhere, here was an E3 moment to rival Shenmue 3 for some of us – those that love the game truly, utterly adore it. So it was sad to see this improbable Yoko Taro/Platinum Games collaboration not get a slice of the big-time at Sony’s press conference. With Square Enix declining to hold their own conference this year, the only look we got at the game was through a Square Enix Presents livestream, and thankfully it looked and sounded absolutely brilliant. But it was a slice out of an eight-hour livestream that couldn’t hope to have the reach of a platform holder’s live show.

Star Ocean Integrity and Faithlessness
Star Ocean's Fidel and Miki
Another game that could have showed up at Sony’s show was the upcoming new Star Ocean instalment. Granted, the reason we didn’t see this at E3 is probably just the simple fact that its release is now mere days away, but with the series having been in limbo for a number of years following 2009’s Star Ocean: The Last Hope (like NieR Automata, this is a sequel the fanbase thought it’d never see), it would have been a really nice gesture for the venerable franchise to get a bit of recognition at a major conference again.

Phantom Dust HD

Not to be confused with the sequel/remake/spiritual successor/whatever it was supposed to be that Microsoft announced back at E3 2014, this is basically a port of the original Xbox game to Xbox One and PC. It seems like a pretty small-scale project, small enough that MS didn’t even announce it at their conference, instead choosing to do so on a YouTube Live stream with Geoff Keighley – the news almost managed to slip through the cracks entirely. It’s obviously not going to be a big tentpole title for Microsoft, and I do wonder if this is just them throwing a bone to the fanbase that was waiting for the new game before it was apparently canned last year. If so, perhaps it was left out of the conference itself for strategic reasons – it may have left something of a bad taste in the mouths of those that were waiting for a new title in the series.

Yakuza 0
Yakuza 0
Likely absent down to Sega’s miniscule presence at the trade show, Yakuza was nonetheless at E3, with series’ creator Toshihiro Nagoshi turning up to demo the game for various outlets. The 80’s prequel was announced for the West (well, sort of) at last December’s PlayStation Experience, so Sony have certainly given it stage time before. Perhaps that’s why they chose not to feature the game at E3. It would have been great to see it on a big stage again, but Yakuza has always had a bit of a hard time in the west so it’s almost expected to see it fly under the radar. It is also an intensely Japanese game.

Gravity Rush 2

After the recent port of the original to PlayStation 4, presumably to help build a fanbase on the console, it was a shame not to see this lovely looking sequel make an appearance at Sony’s show. Niche franchises need all the help they can get, so would it have hurt to stick this beautiful minute-and-a-half trailer on the big screen? It would have given the game some much-needed exposure without taking up much time at all.

Mass Effect: Andromeda
Andromeda's Ryder
This may seem a bit of an odd pick, but it feels like all we’ve been getting for god knows how long is dev diary-style sneak peeks. Mass Effect is a huge franchise, and it feels like EA and BioWare have been stringing fans along for ages now; overlong hype cycles tend to have a negative effect on us these days – just look at Watch_Dogs: plenty of people felt they were sick of the game by the time it actually released. With Andromeda out early next year, it really felt like this would be the E3 to host its big reveal party. No doubt we’ll see more on N7 Day in November, but it’s still very disappointing that so little was shown. It was a frustrating moment in EA’s conference, and that’s really saying something.

You’ve probably noted that five of the above games are Japanese, and I do wonder if that points to the reason they didn’t get much love; Japanese console gaming had a bit of a hard time last gen, and while it looks like the industry is bouncing back in a big way this time out, perhaps the market for these games just isn’t big enough to advertise directly to at a huge, western-leaning show like E3. Of course, we saw Final Fantasy XV turn up at Microsoft’s presser, but that series is almost a culture unto itself at this point, and still a massive touchstone for gaming in general. Even then, the Trial of Titan demo shown on-stage by Hajime Tabata and Mat Kishimoto drew plenty of criticism. It’s great that Japanese games are starting to have a bit of a comeback – especially on PlayStation 4 – but whether they can find a decent market in the west is the challenge. Featuring them on the big-screen at E3 would surely help.

I’ve mentioned Sony a fair few times, and that’s because most of these games would have only made sense in their live show. It’s worth noting however that, as well as needing time to properly showcase PSVR, now confirmed to be launching in October, they dramatically cut back their show length this year; whereas previous E3s have seen the company offer up a bloated, meandering two hours, 2016 saw that reduced to a lean, well-paced 75 minutes. Could that have been pushed to 90 minutes and afforded a bit of space for these games? I don’t see why not.

Of course, E3 may be the biggest spectacle in gaming, but it’s no longer the only kid on the block. August will bring Gamescom, Tokyo Game Show hits in September, and Sony may well host their own PlayStation Experience again later in the year. While it would have been great to see these titles on show at E3, hopefully a few of them can get the attention they deserve elsewhere.

inqgroup
It’s fair to say that in the run-up to release, many have approached Dragon Age: Inquisition with, at best, cautious optimism. Others of course, have been downright pessimistic, lingering memories of Dragon Age 2‘s more reductive ideas and restrictive world still playing on their minds.

Some of us have been less restrained than the rest however, so when the game popped up on Xbox One’s EA Access service I couldn’t help myself. Six hours of pre-release Dragon Age fun? Oh go on then. The only problem I had to contend with was what class/race combo I was going to roll. My Warden in Origins was a Dalish rogue, but my Hawke in Dragon Age 2 was a mage, and I had loved both. So I decided to try both, playing the first hour as an elven archer before restarting and eventually settling on a towering qunari mage (don’t call me saarebas!); I have to admit, witnessing every other character in the game craning their neck to look my Inquisitor in the eye was amusing. With that, it was into the game proper.

The first hour takes the form of a prologue dealing with the immediate aftermath of a magical catastrophe at the Temple of the Sacred Ashes in Haven. What was supposed to be a peace summit to end the conflict between mages and templars that began in Dragon Age 2 ends in the deaths of hundreds, with your player character the only survivor. You awake in chains, confused, and you’re soon heading out with Cassandra to attempt to close the Breach that hangs ominously in the sky, and hopefully save your own life into the bargain. Everyone assumes you’re the cause of the cataclysm, so it might be prudent to do something about that.

The prologue is fairly linear, and sees you travelling up frozen mountain paths, battling demons and closing smaller rifts as you head towards the now-ruined temple and the enormous hole torn in the heavens above it. You’re introduced to dwarven rogue Varric (who has thoughtfully brought Bianca along) and elven apostate Solas, and as we battled our way up the mountain, I was immediately reminded of the Sacred Ashes trailer for the original game. This short prologue feels like it gets closer to achieving what that trailer promised than the relevant quest in Origins ever did (sans dragon, obviously), and you’re travelling through the same part of the world, too. I can’t help but wonder if the call-back is intentional.

After fighting your way up the mountain, you reach a forward operating base where you’re afforded your first choice. You need to push onward to the Breach, but do you take a dangerous mountain pass where some of Cassandra’s soldiers have disappeared, hoping to discover their fate along the way, or do you charge through the valley with the bulk of the forces? Ultimately, both sections play out much the same; a small rift battle, and a run-in with an NPC – Cullen, if you storm the valley. Upon reaching your destination, Varric worriedly points out that the Temple is infested with primeval red lyrium, and as you attempt to prise open the rift in order to properly seal it, an enormous pride demon bursts from the Fade to stop you.

Entering tac cam pauses the action at any point. Great for the screenshot junkies.

Entering tac cam pauses the action at any point. Great for the screenshot junkies.

It’s a great first boss battle, an arena-based affair with a huge boss to wear down, a few waves of adds to deal with, and that Fade rift that needs closing. It’s also a good time to get fully to grips with Inquisition’s combat, which neatly blends elements from both of its predecessors. Should you choose to play entirely in real-time, the game plays much like Dragon Age 2, though with auto-attack mapped to a hold of the right trigger rather than requiring constant bashing of the A button. You also have eight quickslots for your talents now instead of six, with the right bumper button added to the previous games’ X, Y and B slots. The left trigger now switches between sets of four talents.

Playing entirely in real-time however means ignoring Inquisition‘s tactical camera, resurrected from Origins‘ PC release and now available on all platforms. Fans of the console titles’ radial menu-based pause-and-play system may mourn its loss (with the radial menu, on left bumper, now offering simple commands like potions and party-hold), but really you’re trading up here. You can enter tac cam at any point during gameplay, which allows you to scan the battlefield before even getting into combat, scoping out enemy positions, strengths, weaknesses and immunities at a glance, and the overhead view makes it possible to inspect the terrain, making it easier to move ranged characters onto higher ground, perhaps, or position a tank in a chokepoint to draw enemies in. And if you’re playing as a mage, the tac cam is invaluable in making the most of your AoE spells.

Much has been made of the fact that mages in Dragon Age: Inquisition have no healing spells, but it’s really not an issue. You have a finite pool of healing potions, but they can be re-stocked at a camp, which you can fast-travel to from anywhere. Moreover, the focus here is on damage mitigation rather than heal-spamming; warriors can generate Guard, a second health bar that protects main health by soaking up some damage, while mages have an area-of-effect spell called Barrier that does much the same, albeit for a period of time. It means that it’s no longer absolutely necessary to have a mage in the party, and should help to encourage more flexible party composition.

After defeating the pride demon and halting the expansion of the breach, you’re hailed as the Herald of Andraste. After a brief 80s TV-style “gettin’-things-done” montage, the Inquisition is reborn and you’re off to the game’s first truly open area, The Hinterlands. A verdant, fertile stretch of land in the heart of Ferelden, the region and its people are under threat thanks to the conflict between mages and templars. The first time you open your map to see a vast expanse of icons littering the Hinterlands, it’s more than a little overwhelming; it can be difficult to figure out where your focus should be, and so you strike out with your party to explore the surroundings. Don’t go too far in one direction though, as you’ll likely get wrecked by a roving group of bandits or maybe even an ill-tempered bear or two.

The best idea seems to be to spiral outward from your starting area, filling in your map as you go and and establishing further camps in the wilderness that you can use to rest, refill your potion stocks and even fast travel between. Doing so also extends the Inquisition’s reach through an in-game currency called ‘Power’ that you will need to accrue in order to further the story and unlock more regions. There are landmarks to claim for your faction and quests to undertake are everywhere. A good few of these seem to take the form of the “kill x of y” template so beloved of MMOs, but if you get bored of monster-culling, there’s always something else to do, like hunting down mysterious magical shards, picking herbs for crafting, or even just exploring to find yet another pretty vista. There’s so much to do – after five hours, I had uncovered what appeared to be less than half of the map of the Hinterlands, and this is just one region out of about ten. This game will eat your life.

Dragon Age Inquisition Hinterlands Map

This was my map of The Hinterlands after five hours.

Dragon Age: Inquisition absolutely nails the sense of exploration that I have always felt the series was lacking; with the exception of the relatively-sprawling Korcari Wilds, Dragon Age: Origins was fairly narrow in its environmental design, and the smaller scale of Dragon Age 2‘s world is now legendary. Inquisition updates Dragon Age for a post-Skyrim world, though you’d be hard-pressed to call it a copy; while you can and will (and, more importantly, should) head off into the great unknown to discover what lurks in that dense forest or over that nearby hill, Inquisition‘s Thedas isn’t one large, contiguous landmass like Skyrim, but rather a number of large zones – again, that impression of an MMO comes to the fore – and though The Hinterlands is the only one I’ve seen so far it is absolutely rammed with all kinds of stuff to find and do, and positively dripping with detail. Just like in Skyrim, you’ll find yourself frequently side-tracked in the middle of a quest by some strange landmark that catches your magpie eye.

And this is to say nothing of the game’s visuals, which are splendid. Inquisition is absolutely drenched in colour, The Hinterlands coming across almost as a bright fairytale countryside, though torn with strife and infighting. Yet the fields and forests still teem with wildlife, some of which you’re going to have to hunt down to fulfil some of those aforementioned quests. In the snow-covered paths of the Frostback Mountains that make up the prologue, the sun glints off of the cracks in frozen-over streams and characters leave footprints in the snow as the powder kicked up by your party’s feet is carried away on the wind. The environment is so dense that after a couple of hours you’re given a search function (mapped to a click of the left stick) that subtly picks out nearby loot that might otherwise blend into the detail-rich scene. Codex entries and misplaced letters can be found all over the place, filling out the history of the region, and even landmarks inform you of their history when you claim them. You’ll stumble across mages and templars engaged in pitched battles, crafting materials will slowly grow back after you’ve passed through to harvest them, and heaven help you if, under-levelled, you wander into a surly bear’s territory. You get a sense of an environment that exists alongside you as much as it does for you, a world that could move on with or without your input.

After five hours, I can already see I’m going to lose weeks to Inquisition. BioWare has always made games that are reactive, but I’ve long wanted their settings to feel more like a real, sprawling world, rather than an interconnected set of places, and here the fantasy series feels like it’s really reaching to grasp its potential.

This is the most expansive Dragon Age has ever been, the most alive Thedas has ever felt.