Archives for category: Limited Editions

Tomorrow, the sequel to one of the 3DS’ most celebrated jRPGs hits European shores, as Square Enix’s Bravely Second: End Layer lands on store shelves. Like Bravely Default before it, the sequel is also getting a deluxe collector’s edition, and because I bought that, I also bought this. Because I’m a sucker for limited editions.

So, what’s in the box? Well, it’s a similar deal to the first game, containing a large art book (the main draw for me), a figurine and a mini soundtrack CD alongside the game – there’s no pack of cards this time, however. One of the things that surprised me with the original game’s limited edition was the size of the box, and there’s little change here; while the box is a different shape, it’s still huge. Where am I going to put this thing!?

Bravely Second Deluxe Collector's Edition

Opening the box, we’re greeted with a lovely piece of black and white art of new character Magnolia on the inside lid, as well as a look at the game box, the soundtrack CD, and the miniature figurine of Agnes in a small box, all sitting in a cardboard tray. Lifting out this tray, we find the art book hiding underneath.

Bravely Second open box

Below, you can get a look at the full contents of the box, before we take a closer look at a couple of the items.

Bravely Second full contents

Probably the only complaint levelled at Bravely Default‘s collector’s edition was the quality of the included Agnes statue. While quite large and weighty (I believe it’s made of polystone), the paintjob was pretty messy, and it just didn’t really look like Agnes at all. That’s been fixed for Bravely Second; while the figurine is much smaller and made of plastic, it actually looks like Agnes, and is a much greater representation of both her in-game look and Akihiko Yoshida’s artwork. In the gallery below, you can see a comparison of the two, but here’s a close look at the figure itself.

Bravely Second Agnes figurine

Last up, here’s a look at the art book, the headline item as far as I’m concerned. Unfortunately, it’s not hardback like the original game’s book, however, we’re getting a much thicker tome this time, and it’s not just an art book. Here we have a full design works book, collecting production sketches and artwork from right across the game’s development. Included are the original Japanese notations, complete with English translations. I haven’t looked too deep into it for fear of spoilers, but a quick flick through suggests this book will be an absolute must have for fans. Also, upon opening it, we’re treated to that same piece of artwork of Magnolia that I mentioned earlier, only this time in glorious colour. See more, including a couple of comparisons with the original book, in the gallery at the end.

Bravely Second Design Works

Overall, I’m very happy with my purchase. Coming in a little cheaper than the original Deluxe Collector’s Edition, with a couple of definite improvements over some of the included items, it’s a nice treat for fans. Now I just have to find the time to play the game! For now, enjoy the gallery, and the game if you’re getting it this week.

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD limited edition
Nine years after it was unveiled at E3 2006 and four years after it saw a Japanese release, Final Fantasy Type-0 is finally available outside of the Land of the Rising Sun. Fans have been clamouring for the PSP spin-off, originally called Final Fantasy Agito XIII and conceived as part of Square-Enix’s Fabula Nova Crystallis mythos, ever since it became available for Sony’s PSP in Japan, and for a while it seemed as if it might never come. The PSP was pretty much dead in the west by 2011, and with the Vita stumbling out of the gate, it seemed almost a certainty that the handheld title would never escape its homeland.

Thankfully, Square-Enix thought up another plan: release the game on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One as an HD re-release. This may seem a cynical choice, using a much-anticipated handheld title as a means to ensure a decent-sized audience for the real big hitter, Final Fantasy XV – even more so when you consider the free demo of XV that comes with first print copies of Type-0 HD. For my part, I’m just happy we’re getting a game I’ve been thinking about playing for nigh on a decade.

And so, I pre-ordered the limited edition. Because of course I did. The limited edition comes housed in a hard box adorned with gorgeous artwork from series’ veteran Yoshitaka Amano, with a slipcover displaying the game’s logo. So what’s in that box? Well, if you’ve paid any attention to the image at the top of this piece, you’ll have a good idea. There’s a hardbound artbook with tons of colourful art and renders – some of which look a little spoilery, so beware if you’re grabbing a copy this weekend. We also have a 200-page manga, with the first few pages in full colour – again, this looks like it might be a bit spoilery, so it’s going to be set aside until I’ve finished my first run through the game.

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD manga

We also have a handful of Ace’s weaponised tarot cards, with art depicting some of the game’s eidolons. These are bigger than your average cards, with a glossy finish to them, and you can see them all in the gallery at the bottom. Last but not least, there’s a beautiful golden steelbook covered in that same Amano artwork that adorns the presentation box. I think it’s probably the nicest steelbook I own, next to the one from the limited edition of The Last Story, and houses both the game and soundtrack selection discs (as well as, of course, a download code for Final Fantasy XV: Episode Duscae). The latter is reasonably generous for a selection disc, holding fourteen tracks from Takeharu Ishimoto’s remastered soundtrack for Type-0 HD, including the suitably epic new theme, ‘Utakata’. I own the original, three-disc soundtrack, so it’ll be interesting to see how the remastered version stacks up.

I’m pretty chuffed with this limited edition, even if I feel like I have to steer clear of some aspects of it for the time being – I’ve managed to stay relatively spoiler-free with regards to the story of Class Zero, so now would be a bad time to ruin it for myself. So now, all that remains is to get stuck in and play the game. Especially as my Episode Duscae code doesn’t yet work. And if you’re interested in that, come back in a few days, as I’ll have some thoughts (and video!) discussing it.

For more images of the Final Fantasy Type-0 HD limited edition, check out the gallery below.

Destiny Limited Edition
Though you probably don’t need me to tell you that. It is the most pre-ordered new IP ever, after all.

And of course, in a move that will surprise absolutely no one at all, I bought the limited edition. No, sadly not the Ghost Edition – I would have, but I’m having to buy the game on both Xbox One and PlayStation 4, so that would have been ridiculously expensive all-in. Nope, I went for the ‘standard’ limited edition, if that makes any sense at all.

My PS4 standard edition hasn’t managed to find its way here yet, but my XBO order has, so while it’s installing, enjoy some pics, and if you’re going to be playing Destiny this weekend, maybe I’ll see you starside.

Bayonetta 2 finally has a launch date!

Late last night Platinum Games’ Yusuke Hashimoto and Akiko Kuroda announced, via the wonderful medium of the Nintendo Direct broadcast, that the Wii U exclusive will launch on October 24th, and it’ll come in three flavours for those of us in Europe.

First up, we’ll be getting the solus version, which contains Bayonetta 2 and… nothing else. Nope, it doesn’t come with a copy of the Wii U port of the first Bayonetta. If you want that, you’ll have to plump for the Special Edition, which packs both games, each in their own game cases, into a card slipcase.

But then there’s the First Print Edition. This is more like the kind of product you’d expect to carry a ‘special edition’ label, packed in an exclusive box (apparently bound in leather) shaped like the Book of Angels, the in-game tome that details the Hierarchy of Laguna. This lovely box contains both games in their own game cases, with a bonus art book contained within the packaging itself. You can see the First Print Edition below, and as an aside, it’s nice to see the cover art for the first game mirroring the original, Kamiya-approved Japanese art from the original release.

Bayonetta 2 first print edition

I’m sure it’s common knowledge by now that I am a sucker for a limited edition, so it should come as no surprise that I wanted this as soon as it was announced. It’s a shame that the art book isn’t a proper book, especially for a game like Bayonetta that has incredible artwork (seriously – hunt down a copy of The Eyes of Bayonetta if you don’t believe me), but I’ll still eagerly pore over those pages. It appears to be exclusive to Game in the UK (at least at the time of writing), costs £59.99 and is limited to 15,300 units, so if you want one you’d better jump in and secure a pre-order now. I’ve already secured mine.

Also announced in last night’s broadcast, which I’ve embedded at the bottom of this piece, was a new Nintendo-themed outfit for Bayonetta to wear. I thought the Peach, Samus and Link costumes were a little bit odd when they were announced back at E3, but this one… this is something else.

Bayonetta Starfox Fox McCloud whygodwhy

Why God, why?! What did we do to deserve this!?

Truly, I’m sorry you had to see that.

But anyway, that can happily be ignored in favour of the stunning action Bayonetta 2 will be bringing us when it launches in seven weeks. The Direct itself is a good watch, and takes time to explain a few things for those new to the series, but keep watching for the epic lengthy trailer at the end – it looks utterly mental, exactly the kind of thing I’d expect from one of my favourite games of the last five years. It looks like Platinum are throwing everything they’ve got into this game, and I can’t wait to get my mitts on it.

Xillia 2 artbook banner
This time last year, I was unboxing my Tales of Xillia Milla Maxwell Edition, and now here I am with a look at the equivalent edition for the game’s sequel, which this time comes in an even larger box.

However, stuffed into that box is a collectors edition that is improved in many ways over last year’s Milla Maxwell set, with an additional item thrown in, a far better art book, and the game and soundtrack selection this time housed in a nice steelbook featuring Ludger’s overweight cat Rollo. I like steelbooks, but it does mean I won’t be able to get this game signed in the future, like my copy of Xillia.

Obviously, the headline feature of this edition is the figurine of protagonist Ludger Will Kresnik. Like last year’s Milla figure, it’s good quality (though not quite up there with Alter’s line of Tales of figures), but it’s not quite as striking as Milla, for me. That’s mainly because I feel Ludger’s design is more conventional than that of Milla, and, dare I say it, a little bland. Still, it’s a nice figure, and you can get a decent look at it below.

Ludger Kresnik Edition Figure Xillia 2

Next up we’ve got the art book, which is a massive improvement over last year’s. This time, it’s not only a full-size book, but it’s hardback too. I’ve mentioned many times that I much prefer larger, hard-bound art books, so I’m very, very pleased with this and it reminds me a bit of the book that came with the Bravely Default Collectors Edition. I’ve yet to take a proper look at it as I don’t want any accidental spoilers, so it’ll sit on my shelf until I’ve finished the game.

Tales of Xillia 2 Ludger Kresnik Edition Artbook

That extra little trinket I mentioned? It’s a replica of Elle’s pocket watch from the game. Except it’s not actually a pocket watch – open it up and you’ll see that it’s actually a compact mirror, with clock detailing on the other side. Made of metal, it’s a nice, weighty piece and a fun in-universe extra. I don’t know that I’ll ever use it for its intended purpose, but then I’d never have used a pocket watch either. It comes in a nice black presentation box which also includes a small black pouch to keep your trinket in.

Xillia 2 Elle pocketwatch Ludger Kresnik Edition

Lastly, there’s the steelbook, which houses both the game disc and soundtrack selection. I’ve not looked at the second disc yet, but I expect it’ll hold a small handful of tracks from the game (the disc that came with the Milla Maxwell Edition was 12 tracks, for instance). It’s a nice steelbook, featuring the face of Ludger’s rolly-polly cat Rollo on the front, as well as a few skit portraits on the back. As I said above, I like steelbooks – I’ll usually seek them out if there’s an offer for one somewhere – but I actually prefer the steelbook that comes with the game’s Day One Edition, which is covered in colourful art from the game. I have to admit that I very nearly ordered the Day One version in addition to my Ludger Kresnik Edition just to get that case, but thankfully came to my senses.

Xillia 2 Ludger Kresnik Rollo steelbook

Overall, I’m pretty happy with my purchase, just as I was with my Milla Edition last year. And now I have yet another character to add to my Tales of figure collection, which you can see in the gallery below, where I’ve added a few more images of the Collectors Edition. Now all I need to do is finish my second playthrough of the first game before I can get stuck into Ludger and Elle’s adventure in Tales of Xillia 2.

In a new Hyrule Warriors-focussed Direct broadcast, Nintendo today announced that Ganondorf, the main antagonist of the Legend of Zelda series, will be a playable character in the upcoming Warriors/Zelda mash-up.

His appearance in Hyrule Warriors seems to give a nod to Skyward Sword‘s Demise; both are hulking, top-heavy characters, have the same long red hair, and they each carry a huge, black serrated blade. Players will also be able to get new costumes for Ganondorf, changing his appearance to match that of Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess. Costumes from those same games will also be available for both Link and Zelda, and all of them can be obtained by registering the game on Club Nintendo. You can see all the costumes in the video below.

Ganondorf joins Twilight Princess‘ Zant and Skyward Sword‘s Ghirahim on the side of playable bad guys, while on the heroes’ side we have Link, Zelda, Sheik, Impa, Darunia, Princess Ruto, Midna, Agitha, Skyward Sword‘s sword spirit Fi and all-new character Lana, to bring the total playable character count to 13.

Elsewhere in the Direct, Koei Tecmo’s Yosuke Hayashi gives us an introduction to mission structure and character progression, as well as detailing some of the trademark Zelda elements that will be present in the game, such as using bombs to help take down King Dodongo – bombs that you will, of course, find in a chest. Nintendo’s top Zelda man, Eiji Aonuma, also appears throughout to introduce more small-scale franchise elements that will appear in Hyrule Warriors, such as cuccos, cutting grass and gold skulltulas.

It’s a good watch for fans of the Zelda franchise who may not have dabbled in the Warriors series before, like myself. Not only does it give a good indication of what to expect from the game, but we can also see how some of the characters handle in battle. Surprisingly, I’m quite looking forward to getting to grips with Lana’s combat style – who wouldn’t want to ride into battle on the back of the Deku Tree Sprout, or summon a giant cucco to vanquish your enemies?

The Direct also details Hyrule Warriors‘ Adventure Mode, which presents specific missions on a grid styled after a top-down Zelda map – appropriately rendered in an 8-bit aesthetic. Each block on the grid represents a mission with its own objectives – the challenge shown in the video is to defeat 300 enemies in ten minutes – so it seems like it’s essentially a challenge mode, and completing a challenge unlocks the adjacent blocks, opening up more objectives to tackle. Using exploration items on the map screen, you can also uncover new weapons or heart pieces that may appear as rare drops in the missions themselves. It also sounds like Adventure Mode is the only way to unlock some playable characters, which is unfortunate for those that aren’t drawn to challenge mode-type gameplay.

Hyrule Warriors is shaping up to be quite a celebration of the Zelda series, and this can be felt in the variety of stages featured in the game. The broadcast focuses on three of the areas we’ll be able to battle through; Ocarina of Time‘s Lake Hylia, Twilight Princess‘ Twilight Field, and Skyward Sword‘s Skyloft. I’m genuinely looking forward to paying Skyloft another visit, but that music – I don’t like what they’ve done with ‘Ballad of the Goddess’. I get that the background music needs to be faster-paced to accommodate the action, but it just doesn’t work, for me. Having said that, the up-tempo rendition of Twilight Princess‘ field music works really well, and I doubt I’ll be able to refrain from whistling along with it.

Development of Hyrule Warriors was completed just over a week ago, in time for it’s Japanese release on August 14th. We in Europe will be getting our hands on Nintendo and Koei Tecmo’s collaborative effort on September 19th, and if you’re willing to give Game fifty of your hard-earned pounds, you can get a Limited Edition that comes complete with a replica of Link’s primary-coloured scarf.

hwscarf

Standard edition for me, then.

colaurora
Today marks the European release of Ubisoft’s gorgeous RPG/platformer hybrid Child of Light. Built on the UbiArt Framework, the same engine powering the recent 2D Rayman games, Child of Light is a downloadable fairytale-inspired title written by Far Cry 3 scribe Jeffrey Yohalem. The game stars Aurora, daughter of an Austrian duke who wakes in a dream-like world and must find her way back to her own reality, meeting up with a number of companions along the way, including the helpful blue firefly Igniculus.

I pre-ordered the Deluxe Edition, which contains a download code for the game, a 24-page art book packed with plenty of beautiful concept art, a light-up Igniculus keyring, some DLC extras, and, curiously, a poster by famed Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. Aside from the development team possibly being influenced by his work, I’m not quite sure why it’s there – as far as I know he didn’t work on the game. I’m not complaining though, being something of an Amano fan (and an owner of this), and it’s an utterly glorious poster. Images of it don’t quite do it justice; it’s rich in both colour and detail, and printed on thick, high-quality stock. It’s just a shame that it’s been tightly folded to fit in the box as I’d love to frame it.

I decided to try out the PS4’s video recording features for the first time, and made a video of the first fifteen minutes of Aurora’s adventure, which you can see below. Curiously, the game seems to strip out audio during gameplay, making my video oddly silent. Considering that the intro cutscene features full audio, I can only imagine that this is a ‘design decision’ by Ubisoft – I tried making a few other videos from the game and sadly came up with the same results. It’s a strange decision on Ubisoft’s part – perhaps it’s to do with licensing issues surrounding Cœur de pirate‘s soundtrack. Either way, it means you can’t enjoy the game’s audio, but you can still get a look at the game’s lovely visuals, and read on below for my impressions from my brief time with the game.

I managed to play the first half-hour or so and thought I’d get some thoughts down on (virtual) paper. The first thing you’ll notice is the visuals. This is an exceptionally pretty game. Screenshots and videos don’t quite manage to communicate just how beautiful the hand-drawn art that makes up the environments Aurora must travel through is. You really need to see this in all it’s glory on your big screen to fully appreciate it. The soundtrack is nicely understated, allowing you to focus more on the visual side of the presentation, though I think I’ll have to pay a bit more attention to it next time I play it, as all I can remember now is that it didn’t get in the way.

In terms of gameplay, I was strongly reminded of two games, at least in the early stages. The first of these is Limbo, Playdead’s puzzle-platformer from 2010. I said at the top of the piece that Child of Light is something of a hybrid between two genres, with the platforming seeming to take up the majority of your time. It has a similar minimalist feel to Limbo, a similar pace of movement and a similar floaty jump. Just as in Limbo, one of the first things you’ll do is grab and push a block to reach a higher platform. There’s also some light puzzling to contend with, which I hope will continue through the game and provide some decent head-scratchers.

None of this is a bad thing, considering what a playable game Limbo is, but of course Child of Light doesn’t share the former game’s bleak, lonely tone. It’s not long before you stumble upon Igniculus, who you have to control with the right stick (or the DualShock 4’s touchpad) and right from your first meeting you’re gently taught how he can help you out. While platforming, Igniculus can whizz around the screen collecting glowing orbs (which can help to refill Aurora’s HP and MP) as well as holding enemies in place to allow Aurora to get in position for a back attack. Of course, Igniculus can also help you out in battle.

Fighting is a different proposition altogether, taking the form of a turn-based battle system in the grand old jRPG tradition. Aurora stands on the left of the screen, her enemies on the right, and at the bottom of the screen is the time bar, with icons moving along it representing both Aurora and her enemies. The last quarter of the bar is the casting bar; every action has its own cast time – the more powerful the attack, the longer the cast time, and anyone who takes a hit while casting may find their attack cancelled and be pushed back down the time bar. If you’re reading this and thinking, “Hmm, that sounds an awful lot like Grandia“, then you’re right. Because it’s lifted straight out of Grandia. Of course, in Child of Light, we also have Igniculus on our side, and using the right stick we can hinder enemies, slowing their progress along the time bar to give Aurora a chance to get an attack in.

It’s very rewarding to be able to get a strike in with Aurora, delaying an enemies attack, and then use Igniculus to hinder the same enemy, allowing Aurora to overtake them and strike again before your opponent has even had a chance to retaliate. Igniculus’ ability to slow an enemy isn’t unlimited however, as it’s governed by a meter (which can often be refilled by gathering blue orbs in the corners of the screen) meaning that rather than being a win button, it becomes a resource that you have to use effectively to gain the upper hand.

This being an RPG, there are of course level-ups and skill trees, though I’ve only levelled up once in my short time with the game, choosing a ‘Starlight’ ability that hits dark-aligned enemies hard. A few reviews I’ve read have mentioned that the game is very easy on the default normal difficulty, so I started the game on hard, hoping for a bit of a challenge. I want an RPG to expect me to make thoughtful, effective use of both my abilities and build, so hopefully the hard setting will offer that kind of experience.

I do have a couple of minor issues that I hope will ease as the game goes on though. Firstly, all of the game’s dialogue is told in rhyming couplets, and these can be quite forced at times, eliciting the odd groan. In general, the dialogue is solid enough (and I have no doubt that this is eased somewhat by the fact that none of it is voiced), but setting yourself the challenge of telling an entire story in rhyme pretty much ensures you’ll have to fudge it every now and then. For the most part, it manages to help sell the dreamy fairytale setting, but don’t expect it to be flawless.

Secondly, unless you’re playing in co-op, you’re expected to control both Aurora and Igniculus at the same time. Aurora is on the left stick, with Igniculus on the right, and it often means you’ll stop moving one so that you can control the other with greater ease. In battle, this isn’t much of an issue; when Aurora can take action, the game will pause, giving you time to move Igniculus near an enemy in case you need to slow them down and then choose an action for Aurora to carry out. In platforming, it can slow your pace somewhat – if you leave Igniculus in place and move Aurora he won’t follow, so you find yourself trying to move both at the same time so as not to leave him off-screen.

Hopefully, both of these issues will prove to be minor niggles that I’ll get used to, as I’m really enjoying the game so far. I can see myself flying through it over the next few days – reviews peg it in the range of 12-15 hours, which, while admittedly short for an RPG, is fine for a downloadable title. It’s genuinely surprising, not to mention encouraging, to see a huge, AAA-publisher like Ubisoft not just taking a punt on a smaller downloadable title like this, but actually getting behind it too, putting out plenty of ‘behind the scenes‘-type videos on Youtube to drum up interest in something that isn’t the usual huge-budget sequel. More like this please, games industry!