Archives for category: Nintendo GameCube

Tomorrow sees the launch of Tales of Symphonia Chronicles, an HD re-release of GC/PS2 RPG Tales of Symphonia, regarded by some as the height of the series, and it’s less well-received sequel, Dawn of the New World. The collection is PS3-exclusive, with both games coming on a single disc, and there’s also a limited edition – something we’ve come to expect thanks to recent Tales of releases.

Of course, I just had to buy the limited edition, because I’m a sucker for soundtrack CDs, plastic figurines and shiny boxes. Are you interested in what’s in that shiny box I mentioned? Of course you are! And luckily for you, I took some pictures. I’ll highlight a few in the body of this post, but be sure to check out the gallery at the bottom for all the images.

WP_20140227_025

First off, the shiny box. It’s a card case with a plastic slipcover over the top, and it’s covered in beautiful art from anime studio ufotable. There are some close-ups of the gorgeous, colourful art that graces each panel of the box in the gallery, and in those images you can see that it isn’t ruined by any logos – those sit on the plastic slipcover, allowing you to admire that artwork in full.

It’s not a big box, as far as limited editions go; big enough to hold a blu ray case, but deeper – think of a blu ray TV box set and you’re not far off the mark. It’s certainly much more compact than the gigantic Tales of Xillia or Bravely Default limited editions.

So that’s the box, but what’s inside? Hidden within, we find the game case, with one game disc and two soundtrack CDs (one each for Symphonia and Dawn of the New World), a new paperback novel written by Takumi Miyajima called Successors of Hope, which bridges the gap between the two games, and five (well, four really) mini figures of Lloyd, Colette, Emil and Marta (plus a tiny Tenebrae).

WP_20140227_052

It’s a nice set, as long as you haven’t seen the US version. American fans get a couple of nice extras that we don’t, such as a steelbook case and artbook, and all the other elements of the US edition are better executed. The box is nicer, the novel is hardback, the soundtrack is spread over four discs (whereas the two EU discs are MP3 audio discs rammed with tracks – these refused to play when I tried them in my Xbox One, so I suspect that they’ll need to be ripped to my PC) and also come in their own 4-disc jewel case, rather than being stuffed into the game case. The game case insert is also reversible, something that isn’t possible in the EU edition because the inside cover lists the OST tracklisting. American fans also get a full colour manual, while ours is not only black and white, but only affords a small handful of pages per language.

It all feels a bit budget compared to the US release, which isn’t really something you should be thinking about a collectors edition you’ve just spent ¬£70 on. It’s a nice set in isolation, and I’m happy with it, but it’s disappointing that not only is it missing a couple of items from the US release, but that everything that did make it in is also not quite as good as its American counterpart.

Anyway, back to those contents. As I mentioned above, the OST discs are MP3 audio discs, with around 50 tracks on each, and they’re housed in the same case as the game disc. They’re are also nicely decorated with full-colour game art, and look great if attractive discs are your thing.

WP_20140227_006

Then there’s the mini-figures. A fair amount of limited editions come with a figurine of some sort (and then there’s the frankly ludicrous Titanfall one), but it’s not very often you get a whole party to play with. The mini figures really are ‘mini’ (at a couple of inches tall, most of their size is down to their gigantic heads), but it’s nice to have a variety of characters in the box, and they’re all nicely detailed. Tenebrae really is tiny though, and is more of an addition to the Marta figure (even standing on her base). Below, you can see them mingling with my other Tales of figures.

WP_20140227_045

Overall it’s a nice set, and it’s always encouraging to see the Tales of series doing well enough in Europe that collectors editions are even viable. Here’s hoping we get one for Tales of Xillia 2, which should be releasing some time later this year, and looking a bit further into the future, next year’s Tales of Zestiria.

Be sure to check out all the images of the Tales of Symphonia Chronicles Collectors Edition in the gallery below.

Last week, I wrote about the announcement of a special collectors edition for upcoming PS3 exclusive Tales of Symphonia: Chronicles. The announcement, made at New York Comic Con, was specifically for the U.S. release of the box set, and I hoped at the time that we would shortly hear that Europe would also see the collection; considering the U.S. release was announced at NYCC, I wondered if we’d get confirmation at this weekend’s MCM Comic Con in London – Tales of series producer Hideo Baba will be in attendance, after all.

Today, the official Tales of Twitter account has proven me wrong, confirming that we will indeed be seeing the collectors edition in Europe, as well as announcing that the game will be out in just a few short months: Tales of Symphonia: Chronicles will hit shop shelves on February the 28th 2014!

symphchronCEEUThe collectors edition, shown above, will include all the same goodies as the U.S. version (which was almost identical to the Japanese LaLaBit Market edition before it). In a large box decorated with gorgeous ufotable art, we’ll get five mini figures (Lloyd, Collette, Emil, Marta and Tenebrae), a novel describing the events between the two games (previously unreleased in English) and a multi-disc soundtrack. It seems “multi” means two in this instance.

So far, the collectors edition doesn’t seem to be available to pre-order anywhere, though I suspect that, like the Tales of Xillia collectors edition before it, it will be exclusively available through Namco-Bandai’s online store. It will also be limited to ten thousand copies Europe-wide (a third less than the U.S.’s 15,000 copies), so as soon as it becomes available, I’ll be throwing down a pre-order. Well, so long as it doesn’t cost as much as that Titanfall special edition

symphA few weeks ago, I wrote about a rumour concerning an HD re-release of cult GameCube jRPG Tales of Symphonia, which originated with a Spanish site interviewing Tales of series producer Hideo Baba. I said at the time that it was difficult to know how excited to get about the rumour, as the wording was a little unclear, but speculated that if true we’d likely hear more about it at the annual Tales of Festival.

That prediction has, happily, come true! At the ToF today, Baba-san has indeed announced the Tales of Symphonia Chronicles (which is currently a working title) for the PS3, and it’s even coming to Europe, Australasia and the Americas in early 2014! The release will contain both Tales of Symphonia and its GameCube sequel Dawn of the New World, remastered in HD. Here’s confirmation from the man himself:

Having never played either game, I’m now massively looking forward to this. A nice bonus would be a local release of the anime adaptation, but that might be pushing our luck a little bit!

It’s great to see Namco-Bandai’s commitment to this series outside of Japan – in the last couple of years, we’ve seen Tales of the Abyss get its first release in Europe, we got a lovely Day One Edition for Tales of Graces f, Tales of Vesperia apparently got a reprint and was actually available to buy again, and in just a couple of months we’ll all have Tales of Xillia (Day One or Limited Collectors Edition) in our hands! It certainly seems like Bamco are going all-out with their flagship series at the moment, and one has to wonder whether they see a gap in the market now that Final Fantasy is floundering in the minds of some.

You can also watch the Japanese announcement video below:

Who else is excited for this!?

sympA rumour has hit the net today concerning an HD re-release of celebrated GameCube jRPG Tales of Symphonia. Dubbed the Tales of Symphonia: Perfect Edition, the pack will apparently contain both the original cult game and its less-well-received Wii sequel Dawn of the New World (called Knight of Ratatosk in Japan). The pair are said to feature HD graphics and the collection will see release on PlayStation 3.

The rumour comes from Spanish site Koi-Nya, which I have linked at the bottom. It purports to be a summary of an interview with Tales of series producer Hideo Baba that took place recently but has yet to be published. I can’t seem to get the page to load no matter how many times I try, but a friend managed to get through and copy-pasted me the body of the text, which I have reproduced below.

During the celebration of Expomanga 2013, we had the pleasure of chatting at length with Mr. Hideo Baba, producer of the series Tales of, and although it was not until within a couple of days when post the full interview, we bring you of the juiciest and shocking news that Mr. Baba dropped relative Tales of Symphonia: Perfect Edition, a remake in HD for PlayStation 3 would include both sets of Symphonia, the Tales of Symphonia Original (GameCube, PS2) and Tales of Symphonia: Knight of Ratatosk -Tales of Symphonia: Dawn of the New World in the West (Wii).

And, following the rumor of the existence of this title whose information we gained from internal sources-nya koi, we decided to ask about its reliability to the producer of the series. Although Baba was not in a position to officially confirm its existence, has been able to drop that thing would be “a representation of the dreams and hopes of the fans, who have long been wanting it” and that may soon know something about it.

In case of confirmation of the existence of this game, which we expect to hear so soon, this game would be released at least in the United States, locating the source from which we obtained the leaked information, and which also spoke that Tales of Xillia 2 would have secured its location in the West .

In addition to this news, Hideo Baba has told us many other interesting news and curiosities about Tales that soon you can read the full interview granted us.

EDIT – I’ve just got the site to load, after about ten attempts – perhaps their servers were overloaded by thousands of Symphonia fans descending upon them!

It’s a little difficult to parse what’s being said here, as it’s been machine-translated from Spanish. To me, it seems that Koi-Nya had heard of an HD remake from some other source, and then asked Baba-san about it, who replied that such a project would be “a representation of the dreams and hopes of the fans, who have long been wanting it”, while also pointing out that he was ‘not in a position to officially confirm its existence’. The problem here is that, thanks to the translation I can’t tell if, having been questioned about the rumour, Baba has basically said “wouldn’t that be great! It’d make a lot of people happy, right?”

I’m a little sceptical – perhaps too much so. I’d like to believe that this website wouldn’t have posted their story if my above interpretation were the truth of the matter, but I’ve never heard of this site before (not surprising, as I’m not Spanish, nor do I speak the language), so I have no context for this; as such, I can’t just take this story as gospel. They do, however, seem to suggest that Baba said we’ll hear about it soon, so maybe I’m just being a massive cynic. As an aside, they also seem to be claiming that Tales of Xillia 2 will see a Western release – I’ve not seen anyone pick up on this little tid-bit.

I want this rumour to be true, I really do – I missed out on Symphonia when it released on GameCube, always telling myself I’d grab a copy later. Then it was too late and it became increasingly hard to find. I watched the Symphonia anime recently and fell in love with the world, characters and storyline, and it just made me even more desperate to play the game. So I really want this to be true. But I’m not going to be getting my hopes up too high until Hideo Baba officially announces it. Namco-Bandai’s annual Tales of Festival will take place in just under three weeks (June 1-2) in Yokohama, Japan, so perhaps we’ll hear more then? Fingers crossed.

Source: Koi-Nya
http://www.koi-nya.net/2013/05/12/hideo-baba-deja-caer-una-posible-remasterizacion-para-ps3-de-ambos-tales-of-symphonia-tales-of-symphonia-perfect-edition/

drippyBy Dan Bushell
The long awaited jRPG Ni No Kuni, which was co-developed by Level-5 and anime powerhouse Studio Ghibli, has finally hit the gaming world, and it’s stormed the charts in style! Many genre fans will agree that jRPGs aren’t as popular as they once were, yet this stunning game has arrived and now sits astride the charts, occupying the top spot against such massive competition as FIFA 13, Call of Duty: Black Ops II and Far Cry 3. These titles may have released in the tail-end of 2012, but they’re still selling in high enough numbers to take the following three spots behind our colourful adventure.

I am a huge fan of the genre, so I was always going to buy this (in fact, I pre-ordered the lavish Wizard’s Edition the day it appeared on the net), but Ni No Kuni‘s chart performance has me very excited about how popular it has been, and I’ve been wondering whether it’s been down to pent-up demand from genre fans, or perhaps new fans are being drawn to jRPGs? I hope for it’s latter, and if that’s the case perhaps it’s the presence of Ghibli – often cited as Japan’s answer to Disney – that is what’s drawing new fans in?.

If it’s the former, there’s certainly pent-up demand to be had; this gen has been a bit sparse as far as Japanese role-playing goes. Sure, we’ve had a handful of excellent genre examples this gen – Mistwalker’s Lost Odyssey and The Last Story, Monolith Soft’s Xenoblade Chronicles and Namco-Bandai’s own Tales of series has furnished us with Vesperia and Graces f, and before long we’ll have Xillia to be getting on with. But I don’t think any of these titles have had a massive impact on sales, certainly not doing as well as we would’ve seen last-gen. Final Fantasy XIII sold a lot, as Final Fantasy titles tend to do, but its sequel only managed half the numbers.

As well as lesser sales, we don’t seem to get as many releases as we would have in the past. During the PS1 era, jRPGs were a powerhouse genre, thanks in large part to the success of Final Fantasy VII. The PS2 was rammed with jRPGs, the Dreamcast had the likes of Grandia II and Skies of Arcadia, and the Tales of series graced the GameCube with Symphonia. But this gen there’s not been much. Some titles just don’t seem to leave Japan anymore (even a Final Fantasy spin-off, Type-0, is MIA here); it can be frustrating when titles don’t secure a release over here due to a presumed lack of interest, and it ends up being a vicious cycle; we don’t get the titles, and so demand drops, and then we don’t get the next title, because the demand is too low.

Tying into this thought, I think back to the Eurogamer Expo in London’s Earl’s Court in September. Ni No Kuni was demoed there, but it was plain to see where most attention at the Expo was going. There were a lot of titles on show at Earl’s Court; big, highly-anticipated titles like Assassin’s Creed III, Black Ops II, Halo 4, Far Cry 3 and others. People were going crazy for these games – they’d queue for over an hour to play a game for ten minutes! Many at the Black Ops II demo seemed to be queuing for that one game over and over, all day long! Contrast this with Ni No Kuni‘s demo area, where a fraction of the number of machines were set up, and you could also walk straight up to play the game at pretty much any time of the day. Namco-Bandai had one staffer on duty from what I could see, yet you never had to wait for her to finish helping someone else before she could talk to you. It just didn’t have anywhere near the interest of other games there; nevermind CoDBlOps, the Doom 3 BFG Edition demo area was busier! And yet here, this week, sits Ni No Kuni, at number one.

Perhaps game sales are down across the board so soon after Christmas, meaning it’s easier to gain the number one spot, but I still call this a significant achievement – Black Ops II was actually top last week, proof that it’s still selling well. That Ni No Kuni has managed such a feat while many places have been struggling for stock is both impressive and disappointing – if Namco-Bandai had issued more copies, they surely would have sold more, but that’s the nature of risk/reward for you, and the company seems to have a habit of downplaying demand for their jRPGs (the Tales of series says hi!). But with Ni No Kuni topping the charts, we can certainly hope it has both pulled in a lot of older fans and a newer generation of gamers to the genre who may never have experienced such games. And we can hope, when the time comes to release Tales of Xillia, that Namco-Bandai remembers this week’s chart.

It’s Monday, and we’re back to celebrate the very best in videogame music! On today’s agenda: the masterpiece that is Metroid Prime.

Last year I replayed Metroid Prime on the Wii (thanks to the wonderful Metroid Prime Trilogy), and when talking about it with friends, I was surprised at how few of them had even heard of the Metroid franchise. Of those that knew of Samus’ adventures, only one had actually played one of her games.

Now, I can kind of understand people missing out on Metroid Prime, seeing as the GameCube didn’t do as well as it deserved to, but for gamers to not have heard of the franchise at all?? I’ve been trying to remedy this sad state of affairs ever since. To that end, I present:


Phendrana Drifts by Kenji Yamamoto

Metroid as a series is known for its sense of immersion, and this piece of music is a perfect example of how that is achieved. The synth soundscapes form a base that serves to remind you that you’re alone on a strange alien planet, while the glacial piano keys and echoing effects perfectly encapsulate the frigid cold of the land Samus is traversing.

That it also inspired this amazing cover version by Metroid Metal’s Stemage¬†is an added string in its bow.


Phendrana Drifts – Metroid Metal by Stemage

If I were to write up a list of my Top Ten Games of All Time (which I won’t, as it’d be too difficult to decide what to cut out), Metroid Prime would make the list without argument. It really is that good. If you have the means to play it, you owe it to yourself to do so.