Archives for category: Nintendo

In a new Hyrule Warriors-focussed Direct broadcast, Nintendo today announced that Ganondorf, the main antagonist of the Legend of Zelda series, will be a playable character in the upcoming Warriors/Zelda mash-up.

His appearance in Hyrule Warriors seems to give a nod to Skyward Sword‘s Demise; both are hulking, top-heavy characters, have the same long red hair, and they each carry a huge, black serrated blade. Players will also be able to get new costumes for Ganondorf, changing his appearance to match that of Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess. Costumes from those same games will also be available for both Link and Zelda, and all of them can be obtained by registering the game on Club Nintendo. You can see all the costumes in the video below.

Ganondorf joins Twilight Princess‘ Zant and Skyward Sword‘s Ghirahim on the side of playable bad guys, while on the heroes’ side we have Link, Zelda, Sheik, Impa, Darunia, Princess Ruto, Midna, Agitha, Skyward Sword‘s sword spirit Fi and all-new character Lana, to bring the total playable character count to 13.

Elsewhere in the Direct, Koei Tecmo’s Yosuke Hayashi gives us an introduction to mission structure and character progression, as well as detailing some of the trademark Zelda elements that will be present in the game, such as using bombs to help take down King Dodongo – bombs that you will, of course, find in a chest. Nintendo’s top Zelda man, Eiji Aonuma, also appears throughout to introduce more small-scale franchise elements that will appear in Hyrule Warriors, such as cuccos, cutting grass and gold skulltulas.

It’s a good watch for fans of the Zelda franchise who may not have dabbled in the Warriors series before, like myself. Not only does it give a good indication of what to expect from the game, but we can also see how some of the characters handle in battle. Surprisingly, I’m quite looking forward to getting to grips with Lana’s combat style – who wouldn’t want to ride into battle on the back of the Deku Tree Sprout, or summon a giant cucco to vanquish your enemies?

The Direct also details Hyrule Warriors‘ Adventure Mode, which presents specific missions on a grid styled after a top-down Zelda map – appropriately rendered in an 8-bit aesthetic. Each block on the grid represents a mission with its own objectives – the challenge shown in the video is to defeat 300 enemies in ten minutes – so it seems like it’s essentially a challenge mode, and completing a challenge unlocks the adjacent blocks, opening up more objectives to tackle. Using exploration items on the map screen, you can also uncover new weapons or heart pieces that may appear as rare drops in the missions themselves. It also sounds like Adventure Mode is the only way to unlock some playable characters, which is unfortunate for those that aren’t drawn to challenge mode-type gameplay.

Hyrule Warriors is shaping up to be quite a celebration of the Zelda series, and this can be felt in the variety of stages featured in the game. The broadcast focuses on three of the areas we’ll be able to battle through; Ocarina of Time‘s Lake Hylia, Twilight Princess‘ Twilight Field, and Skyward Sword‘s Skyloft. I’m genuinely looking forward to paying Skyloft another visit, but that music – I don’t like what they’ve done with ‘Ballad of the Goddess’. I get that the background music needs to be faster-paced to accommodate the action, but it just doesn’t work, for me. Having said that, the up-tempo rendition of Twilight Princess‘ field music works really well, and I doubt I’ll be able to refrain from whistling along with it.

Development of Hyrule Warriors was completed just over a week ago, in time for it’s Japanese release on August 14th. We in Europe will be getting our hands on Nintendo and Koei Tecmo’s collaborative effort on September 19th, and if you’re willing to give Game fifty of your hard-earned pounds, you can get a Limited Edition that comes complete with a replica of Link’s primary-coloured scarf.

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Standard edition for me, then.

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Nintendo and Tecmo Koei have announced the next instalment in the Project Zero series via a lengthy, creepy trailer.

Titled Zero: Nuregarasu no Miko (The Raven-haired Shrine Maiden), it will be released on September 27th in Japan (possibly in an effort to tie into the upcoming Zero film). As Nintendo co-owns the rights to future titles in the series, the game will of course be an exclusive for the Wii U.

The game stars protagonist Yuri Kozukata, who appears to have the ability to see those that are trapped in the land of the dead and return them to reality. As a result of this ability, she is asked to track someone down in Hikamiyami, a sacred mountain with a huge lake at its summit.

The game will apparently be the largest instalment yet in the series, and it seems from the trailer that water will play a large role, with the rain pouring down on Yuri certainly adding to the atmosphere as she wades through shallow pools and winds her way around dark, twisting mountain paths with only a torch to light her way. The series trademark camera obscura returns, and it seems that the Wii U’s gamepad will be used both for this mechanic as well as to show what the world looks like through Yuri’s eyes.

With Nintendo struggling to sell consoles and a number of third parties pushing releases back (or abandoning the platform altogether), it’s good to see a developer keeping the faith and announcing new projects. What’s even better is that their game will be using the GamePad for something other than simple off-screen play – though it’s to be expected, given Project Zero’s central camera gimmick; Tecmo Koei would be crazy not to leverage the second screen of the GamePad for the camera obscura view, and it’ll be interesting to see how they can keep players on their toes by dividing attention between the two screens.

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What’s surprising is how close to release Nuregarasu no Miko is. How often do we see a game being formally unveiled only two months before release? It’s worth remembering that Tecmo Koei also has Omega Force and Team Ninja working on fellow Wii U exclusive Hyrule Warriors, which will also see release in September.

Of course, what those of us outside of Japan have to worry about is whether the game will reach our shores at all. Nintendo decided not to release the last title in the series, 2008’s Zero: Tsukihami no Kamen, outside of their home territory at all, prompting a fan translation effort.

However, with over 100 million Wiis sold in the last generation of consoles, Nintendo could afford to ignore worldwide releases for the odd exclusive (indeed, the US branch originally had no plans to localise the Operation Rainfall titles for the North American region). But with the Wii U finding difficulty in the market, Nintendo will surely want to do everything they can to improve the image of the console among gamers. They had a fantastic E3, and opinions around the Wii U appear to be slowly changing. If they want to keep up the momentum, coming out and announcing a worldwide release for a new Project Zero would be a great way to do it.

Cross-posted on 16bitkings

hwfi_editedA few days ago, a whole host of Hyrule Warriors screens emerged showing off plenty of Skyward Sword content for the upcoming Zelda/Warriors hybrid. In the screens, which you can see here, we were treated to views of stages based on Link and Zelda’s peaceful home of Skyloft, the verdant Faron Woods, and what appears to be a flattened-out recreation of the Sealed Grounds. As far as characters go, we got glimpses of antagonists Ghirahim and The Imprisoned, as well as Link’s helper throughout Skyward Sword, Fi, who appeared to be a playable character.

Now, via a new trailer, we have confirmation that Fi is indeed playable, joining the cast alongside Zelda, Link, Impa, Midna, Twilight Princess‘ bug princess Agitha and new character Lana. In the trailer, we can see Fi’s balletic fighting style as she skips and skates her way through massed ranks of bokoblins, reminiscent of the way she dances in Skyward Sword. As the spirit of the Goddess Sword, Fi can also transform into the sacred blade to attack her enemies.

Hyrule Warriors seems to be shaping up to be the ultimate Zelda fanservice project (you can even hookshot Termina’s moon out of the sky, for goodness’ sake!), and going by the almost entirely female cast of playable characters revealed thus far, one certainly couldn’t accuse Nintendo and Tecmo Koei of not being inclusive.

I’ve never really had an interest in the Warriors games – they’ve just never particularly appealed to me. But taking the Warriors template and turning it into a celebration of one of my favourite franchises is a great way to draw me into the series.

Hyrule Warriors launches for Wii U on September 19th.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess often gets passed off as something of a reimagined Ocarina of Time, and it’s not too difficult to see why; like most of the Zelda games we’ve seen since that much-loved 1998 instalment, Twilight Princess builds on the foundations laid down by Link’s first foray into 3D. Moreover, with a return to a more muted, ‘realistic’ presentation it’s not a difficult conclusion to jump to.

But for my money, Twilight Princess is the ultimate evolution of that strain of the Zelda franchise, taking everything Ocarina did and making it grander, darker, and more mysterious, while focusing more on story and scene composition than any Zelda that came before. It takes what made Ocarina great, strengthens those building blocks, and adds in new experiences (like the ability to become a wolf and sniff out objectives), ultimately managing to earn its own distinct identity.

Nowhere is this more clear than in the game’s Hyrule Field theme. For those of us that played Ocarina of Time back in 1998, it’s unlikely that anything will beat that first moment of stepping onto the expansive Hyrule Field – seeing a game world open up like that just wasn’t something we were used to back in the late nineties. As a spectacle, it’s not something Twilight Princess could hope to replicate, and to my mind, it relies on its theme to distinguish itself from its legendary precursor.

Where Ocarina‘s Hyrule Field theme is playful and sunny, reflecting the theme of a young boy setting off into the world to meet his destiny, Twilight Princess‘ theme is altogether more rousing, suggestive of the themes of a brave young man thrust out into the wider world in an effort to rescue those he holds dear. It sounds determined.

There are of course moments that call back to Ocarina of Time, and one piece that plays on that familiarity comes during a moment where we adventure through the Sacred Grove, in an effort to hunt down the legendary Master Sword, the Blade of Evil’s Bane. Link needs the sword to undo a curse placed upon him, and so we find ourselves in a lost part of the world that seems strangely familiar – it’s as if the long-forgotten ruins of Ocarina‘s Temple of Time have been overrun by the Lost Woods, and this impression is built upon by the music, a mysterious take on Saria’s Song.

It creates a strange mood, taking a well-known melody from a past game and stretching it into something different. Its backing melody feels more like something we would have heard in Nobuo Uematsu’s Final Fantasy VIII soundtrack than something you’d hear in a Zelda game – immediately mysterious, tempering the known, the familiar, with the unknown, the enigmatic. As a whole, it seems to say, “this place may feel familiar, but it’s not the same.”

My favourite couple of pieces of Twilight Princess music though, are also the most idiosyncratic. They’re pure Twilight Princess, laden with mystery, the weight of ancient wisdom long forgotten, and a healthy dose of the melancholy. The first of these is ‘Light Spirits’.

Early in the game, Link must journey to three sacred springs and bring light back to the spirits that dwell there, undoing the dark curse placed upon them by Zant, the King of the Twilight. This theme is heard whenever Link converses with one of the spirits, and it imparts a feeling of their timelessness, suggesting that they have long watched over Hyrule, while also creating a mood that speaks to the unknown nature of these beings that show themselves only to a chosen few. The orchestral arrangement, used for the Zelda symphony concerts, is even better, sounding like something Danny Elfman might have conjured up for an early-nineties Tim Burton film.

My favourite piece by far though comes during an incredibly emotional scene with Midna. After being confronted by Zant at the Lanayru Spirit Spring, Midna is forcibly exposed to the spirit’s light, leaving her near death. Link, transformed back into a wolf by Zant’s magic, desperately rushes toward Castle Town, a dying Midna sprawled on his back, to look for help.

It’s the music that makes this scene so special, a beautifully emotive piano-led piece that plays as you tear across a moonlit Hyrule Field at night, in search of aid for the friend that has been with you since the start of your journey. And it’s not over-complicated – that the music is so understated as you desperately rush to save Midna makes it all the more effective.

The quality of the compositions is such that it’s a shame Nintendo decided to use sequenced music rather than record with a full orchestra, something they did with great success in their next title in the series, Skyward Sword. Happily, with the advent of video-game focused symphonic concerts, we’re able to experience the music as its creators no doubt intended it to be heard, and it’s all the more stirring for it.

Of course, The Legend of Zelda has always had strong, memorable music, and it makes me wish for a Zelda-themed music game akin to Square-Enix’s excellent Theatrhythm Final Fantasy. Like that other much-loved franchise, Zelda has over a quarter of a century of series history to draw from, and it’d be great to celebrate that in the form of a rhythm-action game. For now, I’ll have to content myself with the upcoming fanservice extravaganza that Hyrule Warriors looks like being.

The annual hype-fest that is E3 is now behind us for another year, and the question that many are asking is of course, “who won?” Obviously, the answer to that question will depend on your own preferences and interests, and as we looked forward to the second E3 for Xbox One and PS4, many were excited to see what the next year would bring for these new consoles.

Yet for me, it was without a doubt Nintendo that impressed the most. And I’m honestly a little surprised to be typing that. I had expected them to simply turn up, show off the same games we’ve seen in the Direct recordings over the last year, announce a new Zelda, and then pack up shop. But they ended up doing a lot more than that, and they did it in some style.

Of course, everyone had interesting things to show off, and I watched it all. I can’t help but get drawn into the excitement during E3, so I decided to get some impressions down on virtual paper about this year’s event.

Microsoft went first, getting us started in the early evening of June 9th. True to Phil Spencer’s promises, the Xbox conference was 90 minutes of games, with a good spread of triple-A third-party blockbusters, first-party projects like Fable Legends and Forza Horizon 2, and a good handful of indie titles, like gorgeous-looking platformer Ori and the Blind Forest.

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Immediately after Microsoft’s media briefing, I was feeling very positive indeed. I was incredibly pleased to see that Halo: The Master Chief Collection was actually a thing, as I thought remastering four games in two years would be too much work (and I was kind of right, though I’ll touch on that in another post). Fable Legends looks like it’ll scratch my co-operative dungeon crawler itch very nicely, and it was great to see a bit more gameplay footage for the colourful Sunset Overdrive, as well as hear about its eight-player co-operative ‘Chaos Squad’.

What really got me excited on the day, however, was the reveal of three games that had been heavily-rumoured before E3; Scalebound, an Xbox One exclusive from Hideki Kamiya and Platinum Games, and the revival of two of Microsoft’s older properties in Crackdown and Phantom Dust. Along with a brief tease of Halo 5: Guardians in the Master Chief Collection trailer, these were the things that were the highlights of the conference at the time.

Later in the day though, I started to wonder quite why I had gotten so excited; we didn’t actually see anything of any of these titles, after all. Everything we saw was CGI and gave little away about the games in question. Granted, Crackdown and Halo are fairly safe bets (if you’re a fan of the previous games, you’ll probably love the new ones), though that’s probably less true of Phantom Dust, which is seemingly a reboot of a very niche original Xbox game. Scalebound, though? I couldn’t tell you anything about that game. It’s seems safe to assume that, given Platinum’s pedigree, it’ll be an action game, and I guess there are dragons in it. Will we get to play as a dragon? I guess we’ll have to wait to see more of the game.

Still, it was a strong showing from Microsoft in terms of content to look forward to, even if half of it was made up of blink-and-you’ll-miss-it context-free teasers.

Sadly, I had a more negative reaction to Sony’s conference. Perhaps it was having to sit up until 4am to watch it all. Perhaps it was because it felt like they could have cut their show in half without really losing anything. Perhaps it was the 20-or-so minutes that were spent talking about television and film projects, or maybe it was all the talk of timed or exclusive DLC.

Perhaps it was all of those things, combined with the rather self-serving ‘fan letters’ read out through half of the conference, and the fact that the whole thing ran on for almost two hours and sagged horribly in the middle.

Starting out with some footage of Destiny was a nice touch for me, a huge Bungie fan (and I’ll have some Alpha impressions up later this week, complete with plenty of video content), and following that with another short look at The Order: 1886 could have proved a winner had they chosen to show something a bit more involved. I’ve said before that I’m rather unsure of Ready at Dawn’s new IP, as it seems to look like a pretty but incredibly linear Gears of War clone. This demo did nothing to defuse those worries, showcasing a short slice of gameplay featuring one of the Knights tussling with a werewolf.

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This clip seemed to have more of a survival horror atmosphere compared to the previous footage we’ve seen which is welcome, but gameplay itself seemed even narrower. It was disappointing for me; I had hoped to see something that dispelled my apprehension at the game’s perceived linearity, but instead I’m now more suspicious. I think we could also have done without The Last of Us Remastered at E3 – we know it’s coming, and I would imagine the vast majority of people watching Sony’s conference will have already played it and loved it on PS3 – it’ll be nice to have a higher fidelity version in the PS4’s library, but I feel like the time could have been used for something else (or just cut entirely along with the media stuff to help bring down that bloated running time).

To Sony’s credit, they also had a broad spread of content and managed to pack in a few surprises, such as a live demo of Little Big Planet 3 from Media Molecule (who had previously sworn blind that they wouldn’t be appearing at E3 at all, cheeky scamps), a remake of cult-classic LucasArts adventure Grim Fandango, an exclusive from Suda 51 called Let it Die and a proper trailer for FROM Software’s PS4-exclusive Bloodborne. Again, like Microsoft’s more exciting surprises, we only got CGI trailers that told us very little, but as with those projects, it’s good to know what’s in the pipeline, even if we don’t know exactly what these titles are.

At the very end of Sony’s conference, we got another brief glimpse at Naughty Dog’s latest, Uncharted 4, now subtitled A Thief’s End. It was clearly envisioned to be Sony’s big, crowd-pleasing sign-off, but for me it fell flat. I’ve said before that I was disappointed when Naughty Dog announced another game in the series – not because I dislike Uncharted, but because it worked out so well the last time they did that. No, I like the Uncharted games a lot, but I’ve played four very similar games and didn’t feel that I needed another (incidentally, I’d have said the same about Gears of War had Microsoft decided to show a teaser for that).

With all that said, I was (and still am) really hoping to see The Last of Us leads Neil Druckmann and Bruce Straley mix things up a fair bit for the franchise’s debut on PlayStation 4, and I was hoping to see a gameplay teaser to underline this. Instead, what we got was a short teaser that told us nothing except for the game’s subtitle and the fact that Nate has aged a bit. We got the kind of trailer that would have worked well as an announcement trailer, had the game not been announced a year previously.

To say I was underwhelmed would be an understatement. ‘Disappointed’ would be a better word. Sure, it looked great, but then we always knew it would. I wanted a reason to get excited about another Uncharted game, and that reason needs to be more than just ‘because it looks nicer’. As a final moment of an overlong conference, it simply made me crave my bed as 4am crept up and the sun began to rise.

It ties into my biggest disappointment with E3 2014 – the reliance on CGI trailers, concept footage and prototypes. Both Microsoft and Sony had their fair share of these, but really it was EA’s conference that was the biggest offender. Perhaps that’s because I really want to see what shape their new Star Wars, Mass Effect and Mirror’s Edge titles would take, which meant I was doubly disappointed when all we got was some footage of offices populated by talking heads telling us about what they’d like to maybe possibly do, perhaps. It’s great to know these games are coming, but it’s hard to look forward to something so intangible.

But if there was one attendee at E3 that didn’t rely on such scripted thrills, it was Nintendo. Before the event, the Kyoto company’s decision to abstain from the big press conference dynamic in favour of a pre-recorded streamed ‘digital event’ seemed like a pre-emptive admission of defeat. In retrospect, this couldn’t have been further from the truth.

Nintendo proved they were out to have fun right from the off, with NoA President Reggie Fils-Aime and Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata squaring off in a Smash Bros.-style brawl that was very very silly, yet managed to be somehow entertaining, setting the tone for the rest of the stream. Their digital event ran for a little under an hour, meaning it didn’t really have a chance to get boring, and while you could argue that the run-time was indicative of Nintendo having less content to offer than their two rivals, the reality is that it was focused almost entirely on first-party games – strip out the third-party offerings from Microsoft and Sony’s conferences and they may well have been about the same length.

So while we got another look at Smash Bros., another glimpse of Hyrule Warriors, another peek at Bayonetta 2, we also got new software announcements like Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Yoshi’s Woolly World and an unveiling of Nintendo’s new Amiibo NFC figurine platform. All of which was bookended with gloriously nutty, self-aware Robot Chicken-style vignettes.

Ok, so maybe Mario spin-offs aren’t what you’d call particularly new. What, then, about Splatoon? A new IP announced during E3 that wasn’t leaked or rumoured beforehand? That’s got to be impressive in itself, never mind that the game looks to be an absolute blast. If Splatoon is Nintendo embracing the online shooter, then it’s clearly doing so on its own terms. In Nintendo EAD’s latest game, you don’t shoot bullets, you shoot brightly-coloured ink; you don’t die when you lose to an opponent, you simply get splatted.

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For me, Splatoon was the most pleasant surprise of E3. It gave me serious Dreamcast vibes, reminding me quite strongly of Fur Fighters, but shot through with an AM2, ‘blue skies forever’ aesthetic. It’s essentially a third-person team-based shooter, but rather than focusing on kill counts, it’s all about map control; each team has their own colour ink that they need to splatter all over the floors, the winning team being the one that covers the most ground in their colour. The ink also has other properties, allowing players to turn into a cartoon squid and swim through their own ink at speed, while enemy ink will slow you to a crawl. Splattering walls can also allow access to higher vantage points, giving you a better perspective on the colourful chaos unfolding below.

A decent chunk of the stream was given over to showing off Splatoon, with the three development leads also appearing to talk us through the main concepts and strategies of their game. There has been a growing suspicion in recent years that the company’s reliance on development legend Shigeru Miyamoto may be stifling the creativity of young, up-and-coming developers, and this segment seemed tailor-made to dispel such thinking. That’s not to say that the old guard was forgotten however, as Miyamoto himself showed up at the end of the conference to let us know that he was working on a few new things (one of which is a new Star Fox game that we will hopefully see something of soon), but not before Eiji Aonuma, caretaker of the Legend of Zelda series, made his long-rumoured appearance to show us just what he’d been working on.

Aonuma’s segment was my favourite moment of E3. As he began to talk about his desire to shake up the veteran fantasy series, we saw moments of older games in the series. This was intended to draw a parallel between the freeform exploration seen in the original 1986 The Legend of Zelda and what he hoped to inject into the newest title in the franchise. Then, he snapped his fingers.

Behind him materialised an expansive view of a lush, beautiful Hyrule Field, grass dancing in the wind as Link sat atop Epona watching shepherds tend their goats. It was glorious, and I was immediately reminded of the rapturous reception afforded to the unveiling of Twilight Princess back in 2004, wondering briefly what kind of reaction this new title would have received, had it been unveiled before a live audience.

There was no time to think too deeply on it however, as Aonuma began to talk of a series convention he wanted to keep – that of a seemingly peaceful world that could be turned upside down in an instant thanks to the appearance of a powerful threat. A large enemy, looking like a mix between a peahat and an octorok – only armed with exploding lasers – entered the scene, scattering the farmers and livestock to the winds as it barrelled down on our hero. The scene cut to a narrow forest path hemmed in by ancient ruins as Epona galloped toward a bridge. The monster flew ahead, smashing the bridge and trapping Link. As he reached back to remove his cape, he took the opportunity to draw and fire two bomb arrows, stunning the monster.

Standing on his steed, Link launched himself from Epona’s back, drawing a strange, futuristic-looking arrow which lit up like the enemy’s lasers, and the trailer faded to white. “2015” was all that remained on the screen. If Sony’s Uncharted 4 mic-drop left me cold, this brief glimpse at a new Zelda definitely had the desired effect. It was glorious.

The fun didn’t end with Nintendo’s digital conference however, as they started up their live-streaming service, ‘Nintendo Treehouse Live’. This was an absolute masterstroke, and probably the best thing about E3. Treehouse ran for three days on both Youtube and Twitch, showing hours of live content presided over by a handful of young Nintendo developers and staffers. We got plenty of interesting interviews with developers as they came on-stage to both discuss and play their latest projects, and thanks to this simple, effective format we got to see far more of those games than we’d ever usually be treated to. All of this without any media personalities or corporate suits – just developers talking to other developers about the games they had made, all for the benefit of the gamers watching live.

That the most forward-thinking, fan-friendly take on E3 came from typically the most conservative of the big three – and, let’s not forget, the one that not so long ago took action against let’s players – is a bewildering thought. Yet, without even showing up to the main stage, Nintendo deftly made both Sony and Microsoft’s approaches look a bit old-hat. The good news is that Treehouse is something that they could replicate fairly easily, so hopefully E3 will become more fan-centric going forward. Even if we only have Nintendo doing something like this again, it’s still something to be championed.

While Nintendo personally impressed me more than any other attendee at E3, perhaps the right answer is to say that gamers won. A little bit of a lame response for those seeking drama, perhaps, but there’s tons of great games on the horizon no matter what your tastes. Granted, that horizon seems to be sitting deep in 2015 at the moment, with only a handful of things coming for the end of this year (though Destiny, the Halo collection, Bayonetta 2 and Hyrule Warriors sit high on my to-buy list), but 2015 may just be a marquee year for this hobby of ours.

It’s that time of year: E3 is upon us, and after the blitzkrieg of last year’s dual console showcases out of the way it’s time for some games! Hopefully we’ll be getting announcements by the truck-load over the next few days – Microsoft and Sony hold their conferences tomorrow, Monday June 9th, while Nintendo will be broadcasting a Direct presentation the following day – and I thought I’d provide a quick run-down of the big things we can expect the major players at E3 to show us over the next few days. I say a quick run-down – I wasn’t expecting this to run to two-and-a-half thousand words when I started writing this afternoon…

Anyway! Let’s get started.

Microsoft
Phil Spencer, the new head of Xbox, has been talking up his company’s E3 plans quite a lot on Twitter of late, and he seems to be promising the world. We’ve been told that we can expect 90 minutes of games, games and more games – a mix of third party titles, first party exclusives and smaller games (presumably indies and downloadables). Microsoft has also been on a bit of a roll recently, announcing and showing off big projects pre-E3, with titles like Sunset Overdrive, Halo 5: Guardians and, most recently, Forza Horizon 2 making headlines. We’ve also had another short look at Remedy’s Quantum Break, which is skipping E3 in favour of Gamescom in August. So the question is: just what the hell are Microsoft going to show at E3?

Hopefully, it’ll be stuff we don’t even know about yet. We’ll no doubt see more of the games that have recently been shown off, but Microsoft must have some pretty big stuff up their sleeves if they’re willing to show off their big guns beforehand. Granted, Sunset Overdrive and Halo 5 were announced last year (albeit both with CG trailers) and Forza Horizon 2 has long been rumoured, but these are still massive titles that would have been expected to be fully unveiled at E3.

Spencer has also said that he is looking into bringing back older IP, encouraging followers to share their favourite original Xbox games to gauge interest and also letting us know that his favourite game is Voodoo Vince. Hmm… a hint, perhaps? There has also been talk recently of a reboot of original Xbox game Phantom Dust, a title from Panzer Dragoon mastermind Yukio Futatsugi that never saw release in Europe.

Speaking of older IP, one of the biggest rumours I’ve seen recently is the supposed re-imagining of Perfect Dark as a third-person action-adventure in the vein of Uncharted. The IP has been sitting dormant since the distinctly average Perfect Dark Zero helped launched the Xbox 360 back in 2005, and it’d be nice to see it re-emerge as a premier Xbox One game. Switching the game from an FPS would likely upset some, but the genre is fairly saturated at the moment and the Xbox doesn’t really have an Uncharted analogue, so an acrobatic third-person adventure could easily fill a gap in the lineup.

I have to admit I have no idea where this rumour came from – I’ve just read discussions about it on a couple of forums – but I’d absolutely love it to be true. Rare are still a talented studio, and they should be able to focus on other projects now they’re seemingly free from the albatross of Kinect. A few interviews recently have touched on the fact that Rare have a couple of unannounced things in the works, and I really hope this is one of them. If it is, I hope Microsoft give them all the creative and financial support they need to make Perfect Dark a top-drawer franchise once again.

Elsewhere, we can expect a large Halo presence at Microsoft’s conference. Hopefully we’ll see the Master Chief collection unveiled, the rumoured remaster boxset of Halos 14, and possibly something on Halo 5: Guardians. I imagine we’ll get another teaser for the latter, as it’s at least a year away at this point, and hopefully we’ll get a bit of story detail so that we can kick the speculation up a notch. Personally, I’d also be totally fine with Microsoft devoting a few minutes to the Halo television series, even if it might draw some ire from the usual suspects on forums.

I’m also hoping to see some gameplay of Fable Legends. I want to see if it will scratch my co-operative, class-based dungeon crawler itch. I think we might see a CG teaser for the new Gears of War game; it’s a bit too soon to expect gameplay, but Microsoft and new developer Black Tusk will surely want to remind us all that it exists. There has also been talk of a Japanese third-party exclusive for the Xbox One, with many expecting either a Vanquish 2 from Platinum or a Lost Odyssey 2 from Mistwalker. I’d greedily take either, but I’d hope to see something new.

Sony
Though I own all six of Sony’s consoles, none of them have ever been my ‘main’ platform for a generation. As such, most of their first-party franchises don’t have that strong a pull on me. The thing that could get me the most excited about my PS4 tomorrow night is a new WipEout game. Studio Liverpool was closed back in 2012 (and at the time a new WipEout was said to be in development), so I don’t know who could make it; perhaps Evolution, once they’re done with Driveclub? Either way, a new title in this venerable franchise would get me very excited indeed – WipEout 2097 is one of my favourite games of all time, after all.

It’s pretty much a nailed-on certainty that we’ll see Naughty Dog’s newest Uncharted adventure tomorrow night, and though I like the Uncharted games, after playing through 4 of them over the last few years, the franchise’s PS4 outing is going to have to be a bit different to get me really excited. Hopefully the studio can mix things up a bit, rather than give us the same thing, just shinier. I must admit to having been rather disappointed when it was announced last year; I wanted Naughty Dog to announce a new IP, since that worked out so very well the last time they did so.

Speaking of which, I imagine we’ll also get a gameplay demo of The Last of Us on PS4. I’m interested to see how nice it looks on the new hardware, though I doubt I’ll be buying it at launch. The Last of Us was one of my favourite games of last year (if not of its entire generation), but I feel it’s a bit too soon for me to play through it again. That game is one hell of an emotional journey, and I’m not quite ready to feel it all over again.

Meanwhile, Sony Santa Monica are set to make an appearance at the platform holder’s presser, and they’ve seemingly been teasing a new God of War title on Twitter. I can’t get even remotely excited about this, as God of War is another Sony series that just doesn’t really appeal to me. I’ve tried, many times, to get into the games as they look like something I should love, but I’ve just found myself bored every time. I guess they’re just not for me, which is a little sad as they’re clearly very well-crafted games. Perhaps a PS4 outing will change things up significantly? Fans have been suggesting changes in character, setting and even mythology for a while now – perhaps a Viking mythology-based God of War could catch my interest?

Hopefully we’ll also get a good long look at The Order: 1886. I’m a little unsure of it at the moment, as what little we’ve seen looks like a Gears of War clone, and honestly, if I want to play Gears, I’ll just play Gears. The setting has potential for sure, but I hope it’s not just wallpaper for another third-person cover shooter. The game has recently been delayed into early 2015, so hopefully the extra development time will allow Ready at Dawn to really go to town and build something genuinely new.

The most excitement surrounding Sony’s conference seems to be around FROM Software’s ‘Project Beast‘, which many are assuming is a sequel-of-sorts to 2010’s Demon’s Souls. Though I’ve not played Demon’s Souls (it’s sitting on my PS3 hard drive…), and I’ve only played a small amount of Dark Souls, I can see why people are getting excited for this. The two related franchises have a very dedicated, hardcore fanbase, many of whom hold that Demon’s is the better title, so a new instalment is going to be an instant E3 win button for them.

Guerilla Games are also reported to be appearing, bringing their next project with them. I’ve never been a fan of the Killzone series; the franchise’s PS3 debut was the game that convinced me to buy that console, and I ended up disappointed. I wanted a sci-fi shooter, but to me it felt more like one of the grey-brown trench shooters we were drowned in until a few years ago, just with a sheen of sci-fi futurism draped over the top that made no real difference at all. Having recently played through Killzone: Shadow Fall though, which fully embraces its science-fiction backdrop, I’m prepared to give Guerilla the benefit of the doubt and see what they bring to E3. Rumours say it’s an action-RPG, which will be something of a departure for the Dutch studio. Colour me interested.

Sadly, I think the Vita will be all but ignored again. It made sense last year when the PS4 was the focus, but Sony seem to be happy to let their handheld trundle along gaining a bit of a cult following as ‘that indie machine’. We’ll likely get a trailer showcasing a number of games we already know about, and that’ll probably be about it. I absolutely adore my Vita though, so I want to see more – I’m hoping for a proper reveal for Gravity Rush 2, sequel to one of my favourite new games of recent years, and maybe a bit of Freedom Wars, too.

On the hardware side, I think we can expect to see Project Morpheus taking a decent chunk of Sony’s conference, as well as the PlayStation Now streaming service. Perhaps we’ll get release windows and pricing for both.

Nintendo
One of the things I’m most excited about this E3 is the prospect of a new Zelda for Wii U. Nintendo supposedly considered showing it off last year, but decided it was too early in development at the time. It seems almost inevitable that we’ll see Link’s new adventure on Tuesday, and I’m really looking forward to it. The only downside is that, as Nintendo aren’t holding a live press conference, it won’t get the reaction it so sorely deserves. A new Zelda is a big deal, and it deserves a proper unveiling, rather than a reactionless showing on a live-stream.

There’s also hope for a new Metroid, another series I adore. Retro Studios are done with Donkey Kong (for the time being at least…), so hopefully they’re a few months into development on their next project. Of course, it could be anything at all (maybe they’d like to try their hand at Star Fox next?), but I really want to see a new Metroid for Wii U. Perhaps we could also get a 2.5D game for 3DS at the same time, but if a choice needs to be made, I’d love to see what Retro can do with the Wii U hardware – imagine a Prime title with the scale pushed right out.

Excitingly, Nintendo’s main man, Shigeru Miyamoto, is said to be working on an entirely new IP for the Wii U, something that justifies the gamepad’s inclusion with the console. Nothing is known about it at the moment, but the fact that the creator of Mario, Zelda, Donkey Kong and many others is creating something new is a pretty big deal. Hopefully it’ll be something that can stand alongside the company’s perennial pillar franchises.

Less surprisingly, I think we’ll also see more on Monolith Soft’s X, the spiritual successor to Wii RPG Xenoblade Chronicles. What little we’ve seen so far has looked impressive, but I’m hoping for a more in-depth exploration. Likewise Bayonetta 2, which we’ll hopefully finally get a date for. It is, after all, one of a handful of games that convinced me I needed a Wii U, so it’ll be nice to know when it’s coming.

On the handheld side, we’ll no doubt get another look at Smash Bros. before it releases this summer, as well as the Pok√©mon Alpha and Omega remakes. Perhaps we’ll also see a new title from Luigi’s Mansion 2 developers Next Level Games.

Others
A few of the big publishers will also be having their own conferences as usual. EA have said that they’ll be unveiling six new titles at this year’s E3, but whether these will be brand new games or known quantities remain to be seen. The publisher is expected to go big on Star Wars this year, with DICE expected to show off Battlefront 3, and maybe we’ll even get a glimpse at Visceral’s in-development Star Wars title. That game is supposedly being headed up by Amy Hennig, formerly of Naughty Dog – could it be something along the lines of the sadly-cancelled Star Wars 1313?

We can certainly expect to see more of Visceral’s other project, the recently-revealed Battlefield: Hardline, and the new Mirror’s Edge seems an absolute certainty now – the Facebook page has just been updated today with an image of Faith and the hashtag ‘#E32014’. Great news for me, as I’m a massive fan of the original game.

Square-Enix have recently announced that both Final Fantasy XV and Kingdom Hearts 3 will miss E3, which is surprising, given that they used Sony’s conference last year to announce both titles. It’s likely we’ll see more of both at Tokyo Game Show in September, however.

What will they be showing? My money is on a sequel to Crystal Dynamics’ Tomb Raider reboot, and I’ll be very happy to see it. I’ve recently finished playing through it on Xbox One, having already loved it on 360 at its original launch, and I absolutely adore it. I’d like to see a little less combat and a little more exploration and environmental puzzling in the sequel, but they have an excellent foundation on which to build, so I’m expecting great things. It’s possible we’ll also see the next entry in the Deus Ex series, too. I should really get back to Human Revolution

From Activision, we can expect to see more of Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare from Sledgehammer games. As an aside, I think it’ll be interesting to see a studio born from Visceral taking on Visceral itself, with one studio making a Battlefield offshoot and the other a CoD offshoot. Acti will also likely show a bit of Diablo III: Ultimate Evil Edition for PS4 and Xbox One.

From Ubisoft, I think we can expect to get full gameplay unveilings for both Assassin’s Creed: Unity and Far Cry 4. I’ll be interested enough to take a look, but I think I’m a bit burnt out on Ubisoft games at the moment. I’m sure both will demo well though.

So those are the major things I’m hoping and/or expecting to see tomorrow. If I had to pick a few things I’m most excited about, I’d say a new Zelda, the possibilities of new titles for both Metroid and Perfect Dark, and discovering what form Halo‘s 2014 release will take are right at the very top. I’m also hoping to see a fair bit of new IP on show, but it’s obviously harder to be excited for stuff that, as yet, doesn’t exist. Perhaps Guerilla’s new game will wow me.

What are you most excited to see? Leave a comment below (if you managed to read this far).