Archives for posts with tag: Hajime Tabata

Luna
Back in March, Square Enix’s grand event to finally, finally announce a release date for the long-in-development Final Fantasy XV came with a number of surprises. The Japanese publisher appeared to be incredibly bullish about the upcoming RPG, and unveiled a catalogue of cross-media projects to compliment it. There was a five-part anime series to give us the background on the main characters and their relationships. There was the obligatory mobile game tie-in. And then there was Kingsglaive. Easily the most exciting part of the extended media offering, here was a beautiful CG movie in the vein of Final Fantasy VII‘s Advent Children, and it came completely out of nowhere.

Of course, the game’s release date has since slipped, even as all the marketing has remained on target. And that includes Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV, now available to buy on a handful of digital platforms. What was once a mouth-watering starter to the main course of Final Fantasy XV must now span a two month gap until the long-awaited title is in our hands. But does it slake our thirst for Final Fantasy or leave us unsatisfied?

Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV effectively acts as a visually-spectacular two-hour cutscene intro to the full game, setting the scene for Noctis and friends’ world-spanning road trip. It introduces us to the conflict between the magical kingdom of Lucis, empowered by an enormous crystal, and the military empire of Niflheim, which uses its magitek creations and enormous ‘demons’ to conquer and subjugate other nations. King Regis of Lucis assembles a group of elite warriors empowered by the crystal, dubbed the Kingsglaive, and though they are able to wield powerful magic, they are unable to turn the tide. After years of war, the empire sends its chancellor, Ardyn Izunia, to initiate peace talks to be held in Insomnia, the capital of Lucis. Of course, there is an ulterior motive, and as both sides scheme around the talks, each takes the opportunity to end the war in their favour.

Which begs the question: why would the Lucians agree to hold the talks in their capital city, inviting their enemies right into the heart of their land? Why not a neutral location? Because Kingsglaive doesn’t really make a lot of sense, that’s why. It’s entertaining enough in its big, flashy action setpieces, and there’s a ton of fan service in here for those looking (including monsters like the behemoth, summons, and even an appearance by a curious character from Final Fantasy VI), but the thrust of the story isn’t particularly engaging thanks to implausible decisions made by literally every character in play.

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There’s a curious subplot about immigration threaded through much of Kingsglaive‘s narrative. As Niflheim marches through Lucis, conquering the outer reaches of its territory in the process, its citizens are driven toward the capital city of Insomnia, to take shelter beyond its magical wall. It’s a thread that’s never really developed or explored beyond a few jibes and uses of the word immigrant; even our protagonist Nyx, Kingsglaive member and so-called immigrant himself, is unable to give us any real insight into what life was like for him before he came to Insomnia. And then there’s the fact that these people are still Lucians, they’re just not from the nation’s capital, which makes the whole thing feel a little forced. Perhaps ‘refugee’ would have been a better word to use, and it may have even enabled Kingsglaive to say something interesting about people fleeing conflict.

Instead, it’s used as a basic plot device to provide justification to characters who don’t quite get the development they need, despite a relatively small core cast and a two hour runtime. These are pretty digital avatars that exist to look cool and do awesome things, rather than believable people with their own needs and desires, and as such it’s hard to develop much of an attachment to them. We’re told what these people are fighting for, but never shown, so we never really get a real feel for their motivations. And when we see a character die, we’re not sad for the loss of someone we had become interested in, but rather disappointed that we likely won’t see them in the game, where we might have learned more about them and actually come to care for them.

There’s also the issue of Luna. The female lead in both the game and the film, Lunafreya Nox Fleuret is the princess of the conquered kingdom of Tenebrae, and we’ve long been assured that she’ll be a strong character – necessarily so, to balance out the all-male core cast of the game. Yet she spends almost the entirety of the film being dragged around by men who either seek to use her or need to protect her. Telling the audience, repeatedly, that she’s not afraid to die if it means accomplishing her mission doesn’t really count as strength when she repeatedly throws herself into peril that she needs to be saved from. Here’s hoping there’s more to her in the full game, rather than just being a device to enable Noctis’ destiny.

And yet for all that, Kingsglaive still manages to engage and entertain in a handful of ways. Of course, part of the attraction is the astonishing animation work on show; if you thought Advent Children Complete looked amazing, Kingsglaive is on another level altogether – it simply appears photoreal at times. The illusion is tarnished somewhat by the widespread use of ADR, but the film is just incredible to look at, whether you’re gazing at its characters, locations or flashy special effects. Fight scenes are big, brash and full of carnage, well choreographed even if the director sometimes forgets to frame the action appropriately, though the latter stages of the film can hew a little too close to Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel for comfort. And while much of the supporting cast are a little overwrought, the core trio of Sean Bean, Lena Headey and Aaron Paul turn in good, naturalistic performances – at least, as far as the material they’re given allows.

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Of course, the other big draw Kingsglaive has is that it allows us a look into that enigmatic universe that so many of us have been dying to get to know for a decade now, and that the film finally cracks open a window that we might peek inside is genuinely exciting. That fantasy based on reality is now a little closer to being real and in our hands, and Kingsglaive even has something for those that have been following every trailer since the first one back in 2006, delivering its own take on that now-iconic party/invasion scene that fans had been obsessively watching as they hung on for news, this time playing host to a meeting between Nyx and Luna, rather than Noctis and Stella.

It’s clear to see that some material excised from the game in the switch from Versus XIII to XV has been repurposed for this film, and the fact that we’ll now never experience the invasion of Insomnia in-game genuinely saddens me. As such, Kingsglaive ultimately leaves me with mixed feelings; though I’m more excited for the game having seen the film, I’m simultaneously a bit sad for what might have been. Since its re-reveal back at E3 2013, fans have been digging into every detail in an attempt to pick apart the differences between Tetsuya Nomura’s vision of Versus XIII and Hajime Tabata’s Final Fantasy XV. As a preamble to the game, Kingsglaive doesn’t give us much to go on, other than adapting the invasion of Insomnia and contriving a reason for Noctis’ absence, but there’s still the nagging sense that maybe this isn’t quite the same world we’ve spent a decade pining for, even if the nouns remain the same.

But ten years later, this is the world we’re getting, and the journey begins with Kingsglaive. As an introduction to Final Fantasy XV‘s world and lore, it works – just about – and there’s plenty for series fans to salivate over. It’s also gratifying to see just how much fantasy there actually is in this newest incarnation of the veteran series, despite the glossy modern city setting and trappings thereof. As a standalone film? Not so much. But then it was always going to be one for the fans, a gateway into Square Enix’s next grandiose adventure.

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So, it’s official: Final Fantasy XV has been delayed. Rumours sprang up over the weekend, based on conversations with retail sources and backed up by photos of marketing materials, but yesterday director Hajime Tabata confirmed it to be true, with the long-in-development title being bumped from its original date of September 30th to November 29th.

In a video, which you can see below, Tabata explained that, while the game went gold a few days ago and the team had begun work on a day one patch, they had ultimately decided to push the release back to make sure these fixes could be pressed to the game discs that we’ll all be buying at retail. “Our objective with Final Fantasy XV was to deliver a Final Fantasy of the highest possible quality, to every single person who buys the game,” said Tabata, who went on to explain that, because not everyone who buys the game would be able to apply the patch, the team felt the best course of action was a short delay. Not only will the patch improve the game’s performance and overall polish, it will also contain “pretty substantial content,” added Tabata.

And so, we’ll be waiting a further two months to get our grubby mitts on the game. And while it might seem a ridiculous thing to say about a game that was announced ten years ago, it’s probably for the best they don’t rush this one out before it’s done. Not only are there a decade of fan expectations riding on it, but possibly the Final Fantasy brand itself, which has taken a bit of a battering in the wake of the Final Fantasy XIII trilogy and the disastrous launch of Final Fantasy XIV Online. While XIV 2.0 has seen an enormous turnaround to become a massive success, the brand is still in a bit of a precarious situation. Square Enix needs this one to be a hit.

Perhaps as some form of consolation, we have been treated to some new content to tide us over for a bit. First off, we now have the first twelve minutes of CGI tie-in movie Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV available to watch on YouTube. The film, which takes place just before the start of the game, begins with a scene-setting narration from Lunafreya Nox Fleuret, the princess of Tenebrae, who brings us up to speed on the state of the world, and the conflict between the magical nation of Lucis and the militaristic empire of Niflheim, who desire the crystal that powers Lucis’ prosperity. As a young Noctis visits Tenebrae with his father, the kingdom is attacked by Niflheim soldiers in an attempt on the Lucian royalty’s lives. Noctis and his father escape, but Tenebrae comes under imperial rule.

Later, we see a battle between Lucis’ Kingsglaive, an elite force of soldiers bestowed with the power of Lucis’ crystal, and the invading forces of Niflheim, made up of human and mechanical soldiers, as well as an assortment of quite horrific looking monsters, including enormous behemoths. There’s even a cameo from a ‘daemon’ that fans of Final Fantasy VII will recognise. It’s been a fair while since we’ve had a CGI film out of Square Enix, and it’s clear to see the upgrade from Advent Children; Kingsglaive simply looks photorealistic at times, especially where character faces are concerned. The editing can feel a little schizophrenic during action scenes, as if the director was on a days-long Red Bull binge, but it does serve to give this first huge battle a frantic feel, and it’s certainly a hell of a spectacle, as the two forces clash over an abandoned town on the edge of a huge, precipitous rock bridge.

Ultimately, this quick look at Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV isn’t going to sate your thirst for anything FFXV-related, as it’s likely to just leave you wanting more. At least the full film will be available to download in just two weeks’ time.

The second bit of new content has just been made available to coincide with the start of Gamescom in Cologne, where the game is playable from the start. Unsurprisingly, it’s a gameplay video from the very beginning of the game, and it runs for almost an hour. This footage has been taken from the gold master version mentioned in Tabata’s apology video, so we can get a look at how the game runs at this stage in development, before the addition of what would have been the day one patch. Fans who played last year’s Episode Duscae will feel immediately at home as, after a rather interesting bit of foreshadowing, the game begins with Noctis and his retinue arriving at the Hammerhead garage to get their broken down car fixed. Luckily, this time Cindy isn’t asking them to hunt down an enormous behemoth, and instead charges them with a bit of simple pest control to pay off their debt.

There are changes though. The party meet Cid almost immediately, and the Hammerhead itself isn’t actually in Duscae this time, but the neighbouring region of Leide. So if you’re sick of seeing the green fields and shimmering lakes of Duscae, at least now you can look at some parched, mountainous scrubland instead. Result? Throughout the fifty-minute clip, we get to see plenty of features of the game, taking in combat, quests, camping, driving, and even a smattering of cutscenes, though with some judicious editing to make sure we aren’t spoiled too much. The footage comes from the first three chapters, which Famitsu report took them 25 hours to get through, so we’re getting a pretty in-depth look at the early stages of the game here.

Final Fantasy XV looks to be in pretty great shape from this extended look, and though it’s a pain to see it delayed just as it was getting close enough to grasp, we can’t complain about a bit of extra time to polish it up to a pristine shine. And besides, after ten years, what’s a couple of extra months?

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Though GameSpot managed to spill the beans mere hours before Square Enix’s Uncovered: Final Fantasy XV event in Los Angeles last night, spoiling the upcoming title’s release date in a since-removed YouTube video, they certainly didn’t manage to ruin all the surprises. Square Enix’s social media accounts had promised that fans of the long-running Final Fantasy saga should tune in regardless, promising they’d be missing out if they didn’t watch. And, as it turns out, they were absolutely spot on, as Uncovered featured a bevy of reveals, announcements and surprises, the first of which was Hironobu Sakaguchi, the father of Final Fantasy, opening the show.

Taking the stage to rapturous applause, Sakaguchi-san talked about how he views the series as his child, and much like a child, a parent often wonders whether they are on the right path or not – a not so veiled reference to the franchise’s recent struggles that sent some ripples of laughter through the 6,000-strong audience, and set a playful, self-assured tone for the rest of the night. Though he hasn’t been involved with Final Fantasy for quite some time now, leaving Square Enix over a decade ago, he spoke about how he had a chance to sit down with Final Fantasy XV director Hajime Tabata, who told him that he planned to take the series back to its ‘challenger’ roots. This reassured Sakaguchi, who had always thought of Final Fantasy as something that always sought out new challenges, and it certainly looks like that’s what the team are hoping to do with Final Fantasy XV.

The main takeaway from Uncovered is that Square Enix seem to be incredibly bullish about Final Fantasy XV‘s chances at recapturing the public’s imagination. They’re going all out with this property, treating fans to a lavish event streamed around the world, with Final Fantasy royalty in the house – as well as Sakaguchi-san, long-standing series artist Yoshitaka Amano, FFXV composer Yoko Shimomura and director Hajime Tabata were all in attendance. Last night’s event wasn’t just to generate hype for the new game, which we now know will be launching worldwide on September 30th (yes, this year); it was also to announce that Final Fantasy XV will be accompanied by its very own compilation of expanded material. Years after Final Fantasy VII’s release, with its legacy already assured, Square Enix began the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. With Final Fantasy XV, they’re establishing it as its very own metaseries right now.

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In an astonishing display of confidence, last night Square Enix, via presenters Greg Miller and Tim Gettys of Kinda Funny Games, announced that Final Fantasy XV will be getting a five-part anime prequel series, a feature-length CG movie, and a mobile app minigame. They’re going all-in with this, turning Final Fantasy XV into a complete cross-media sub-franchise of its own, so let’s talk about each of those in a bit more detail. Brotherhood, the anime prequel, stars the game’s four main characters – Noctis, Ignis, Gladio and Prompto – and serves as a direct prequel to the game, promising to elaborate on the history and bonds between our heroes. Made by A-1 Pictures, the animation house behind the likes of Sword Art Online, the five episodes will be free to watch on Square Enix’s YouTube page, and the first one is already available to watch now. I’ll be writing about that in more depth in a separate piece.

Kingsglaive is the name of the CG movie, a feature-length film in the vein of 2005’s Final Fantasy VII sequel Advent Children, and it focuses on the characters of Noctis’ father King Regis of Lucis, Noctis’ betrothed, Lunafreya Nox Fleuret, and the soldier Nyx, a member of the titular Kingsglaive, an elite unit commanded by King Regis as they try to push back Niflheim’s imperial army. In another show of confidence, the film will feature an all-star cast, with Sean Bean, Lena Headey and Aaron Paul starring as Regis, Luna and Nyx respectively, though it’s not yet clear whether these same actors will reprise their roles in the game itself (or whether Nyx will even appear in-game). It certainly doesn’t seem to be the case, going by the game’s latest trailer, in which Regis sports an American accent, but time will tell. Kingsglaive will be available to stream and download worldwide sometime this year, and you can see the trailer below.

And then there’s Justice Monsters Five, a minigame that appears and is playable within Final Fantasy XV. Existing within the game’s fiction – we see our heroes excitedly come across a table in a diner – Justice Monsters Five appears to be some kind of pinball/battling hybrid featuring iconic Final Fantasy monsters. Leading up to its unveiling, names like Tetra Master, Triple Triad, Blitzball and Chocobo Racing were bandied about, so we can assume that Justice Monsters Five will be the main minigame in Final Fantasy XV. But it won’t just exist inside the game of course, as it will be coming to iOS, Android and Windows 10 as a standalone app, so you can get your Justice Monsters Five fix on the go.

While there was quite a focus on the supplemental, expanded universe content during the Uncovered event, that’s not to say we didn’t get a good look at the game itself. Viewers were treated to a few short gameplay clips featuring things such as chocobo riding (chocobos can jump, glide, and even drift around corners), and driving in the party’s car, the Regalia. Of course, an open world game with driving wouldn’t be complete without radio stations, and Final Fantasy XV doesn’t disappoint here, offering a selection of classic Final Fantasy songs from across the franchise’s entire history to cruise along to – we heard short snippets of the overworld theme from the first Final Fantasy game, as well as Sunleth Waterscape from XIII. As a huge fan of Final Fantasy music this is something that will make me very happy indeed, and I can imagine driving around the world for hours just listening and humming along to some classic FF tunes.

While driving around, we also see a car stopped at the side of the road, its occupants trying to flag down help, and it’s suggested that this is an example of some of the side content we’ll be seeing in the full game. Following that was a short clip of the party in battle, mostly showing off stuff that you’ll be familiar with if you played Episode Duscae last spring, with the addition of a short look at magic as we see Noctis manage to scare off an enormous Behemoth by casting Blizzara. Then we’re treated to a brief glimpse of an absolutely titanic Titan, and at this point it’s worth remembering that the summons in this game are going to be insane. We also saw a clip showcasing some of the beautiful, sprawling environments that we’ll be visiting throughout the world of Final Fantasy XV, including our first in-game look at the gorgeous, Venice-inspired city of Altissia. Final Fantasy XV has long been billed as “a Fantasy based on Reality’, but fans of the fantastical need not worry that the game will appear mundane; there seems to be plenty of fantastical elements and environments in there to justify the name, and you can see the clip shown last night below, courtesy of Youtuber YongYea. Honestly, it’s worth watching for the music alone, which is stunningly beautiful.

Before our final surprise of the night, there was time for a couple more announcements. First heard in the opening trailer, the theme song for Final Fantasy XV is a lush, orchestral reimagining of Ben E. King’s Stand by Me, performed by Florence and the Machine. I must admit that I thought it sounded incredibly out of place when it suddenly began, halfway through that trailer, even if does seem like an obvious song choice for a story about four friends heading out on an uncertain journey. But I think it’s going to grow on me. Florence Welch’s powerful vocal performance certainly sells the emotion of the piece, and as the trailer goes on it seems to fit more and more. If Square Enix must insist on this kind of thing, at least it’s a much better choice than Leona Lewis’ My Hands was for Final Fantasy XIII.

Perhaps most exciting of all, however, was the announcement of a new demo. This one isn’t tied to a purchase, unlike the Episode Duscae demo that accompanied Final Fantasy Type-0 HD last year, so it’s available for everyone to try on both PS4 and Xbox One. Titled the ‘Platinum Demo’, it begins with a strange premise; you control kid Noctis as he journeys through a dream, guided by Carbuncle as he makes his way to the royal citadel, armed only with a toy sword and a squeaky hammer. It sounds odd, but the good thing is you don’t have to wait to find out just how weird it is, as the demo is live on both storefronts right now. I haven’t yet had a chance to play it myself, so, like with the Brotherhood anime, I’ll be writing up some impressions, complete with video, a little later, much like I did last year with Episode Duscae.

And so we were coming to the end of the Uncovered event, with Director Hajime Tabata taking to the stage to announce the release date that we all already knew. This didn’t mean the stream ended without a surprise, however; Tabata had recently teased that the team had determined how to include airship travel in the game, a core FF motif that has been essentially missing from the last few main series titles that fans really want back. At the very end of an epic, extended trailer, we see the party’s flash car sprout wings and take to the skies. If I’m being honest, I found it to be a little goofy, as the car begins to transform and a pair of wings fold out before it rather quickly takes off. Hopefully it’s just one method of transport – the same trailer shows the boys speeding across the water in a yacht, for instance.

Still, the thought of driving, boating and flying around this massive world is tantalising, and with all of last night’s announcements still ringing in the ears, today is a good day to be a Final Fantasy fan. Square Enix seem hugely confident about the prospects of this long-in-development epic and its chances at winning back the limelight and returning to the enormous, world-conquering franchise it used to be. And I for one cannot wait to dive right in and experience it. I’ll have to wait until September of course, but what’s another six months when you’ve been dreaming of it for ten years?

See the epic extended trailer for Final Fantasy XV, complete with flying transformer car, below.

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD limited edition
Nine years after it was unveiled at E3 2006 and four years after it saw a Japanese release, Final Fantasy Type-0 is finally available outside of the Land of the Rising Sun. Fans have been clamouring for the PSP spin-off, originally called Final Fantasy Agito XIII and conceived as part of Square-Enix’s Fabula Nova Crystallis mythos, ever since it became available for Sony’s PSP in Japan, and for a while it seemed as if it might never come. The PSP was pretty much dead in the west by 2011, and with the Vita stumbling out of the gate, it seemed almost a certainty that the handheld title would never escape its homeland.

Thankfully, Square-Enix thought up another plan: release the game on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One as an HD re-release. This may seem a cynical choice, using a much-anticipated handheld title as a means to ensure a decent-sized audience for the real big hitter, Final Fantasy XV – even more so when you consider the free demo of XV that comes with first print copies of Type-0 HD. For my part, I’m just happy we’re getting a game I’ve been thinking about playing for nigh on a decade.

And so, I pre-ordered the limited edition. Because of course I did. The limited edition comes housed in a hard box adorned with gorgeous artwork from series’ veteran Yoshitaka Amano, with a slipcover displaying the game’s logo. So what’s in that box? Well, if you’ve paid any attention to the image at the top of this piece, you’ll have a good idea. There’s a hardbound artbook with tons of colourful art and renders – some of which look a little spoilery, so beware if you’re grabbing a copy this weekend. We also have a 200-page manga, with the first few pages in full colour – again, this looks like it might be a bit spoilery, so it’s going to be set aside until I’ve finished my first run through the game.

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD manga

We also have a handful of Ace’s weaponised tarot cards, with art depicting some of the game’s eidolons. These are bigger than your average cards, with a glossy finish to them, and you can see them all in the gallery at the bottom. Last but not least, there’s a beautiful golden steelbook covered in that same Amano artwork that adorns the presentation box. I think it’s probably the nicest steelbook I own, next to the one from the limited edition of The Last Story, and houses both the game and soundtrack selection discs (as well as, of course, a download code for Final Fantasy XV: Episode Duscae). The latter is reasonably generous for a selection disc, holding fourteen tracks from Takeharu Ishimoto’s remastered soundtrack for Type-0 HD, including the suitably epic new theme, ‘Utakata’. I own the original, three-disc soundtrack, so it’ll be interesting to see how the remastered version stacks up.

I’m pretty chuffed with this limited edition, even if I feel like I have to steer clear of some aspects of it for the time being – I’ve managed to stay relatively spoiler-free with regards to the story of Class Zero, so now would be a bad time to ruin it for myself. So now, all that remains is to get stuck in and play the game. Especially as my Episode Duscae code doesn’t yet work. And if you’re interested in that, come back in a few days, as I’ll have some thoughts (and video!) discussing it.

For more images of the Final Fantasy Type-0 HD limited edition, check out the gallery below.

agito
Back in 2006, Square-Enix introduced us to the Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy XIII concept, ostensibly a series of Final Fantasy games that share an overarching mythology, if not setting. This was originally intended to include the numbered series title Final Fantasy XIII, as well as PS3 exclusive Versus XIII and PSP title Final Fantasy Agito XIII.

Now we find ourselves in 2013 and one of those titles is missing in action, (leading many to assume it’ll never see the light of day) while another remains trapped in Japan with no hint that it might one day escape. Instead, we’ve received a sequel to Final Fantasy XIII (which, while I liked it, enjoyed a mixed reception at best), with another, Lightning Returns, on the horizon.

As I mentioned above, Versus XIII seems almost dead in the water; there’s been no word on it for some time now, beyond a rumour last year that it had been repurposed into Final Fantasy XV and would be unveiled at E3 that year. Obviously that didn’t happen, leading some to claim the game had been quietly mothballed. Square-Enix themselves have publically stated that Versus XIII is still in development, but after more than seven years of tinkering, it’s difficult to remain positive.

What makes this situation more aggravating is that the aforementioned PSP game, since renamed to Final Fantasy Type-0, was released in Japan nearly 18 months ago. It provably exists – development is long since finished, yet there has since been no word on a Western localisation, bar a couple of rumours that the Vita may see a port (due to the PSP being more or less a dead platform outside of Japan), leading to some online retailers listing it for pre-order. These listings have since been removed.

Back in September, while I was reporting the weekly DLC updates for 3DS rhythm-action title Theatrhythm Final Fantasy, I noted the release of Type-0‘s opening theme ‘We Have Arrived’ might be a positive sign for localisation. Unfortunately, since that rather epic-sounding track was issued for Theatrythm, we’ve had but one mention of Type-0 from Square; in a November 2012 interview with GameSpot, Director Hajime Tabata had the following to say:

“Due to market reasons, we are taking a clean slate in terms of our plans. We feel strongly about bringing this title to the fans in North America and Europe, so if an opportunity arises that can become a conclusive factor, we are prepared to go into consideration right away.”

I don’t know about you, but that doesn’t sound massively positive to me. He’s basically confirming that no localisation work has even been considered at this stage, let alone begun.

All of which makes the news that dedicated fans are currently working on a Type-0 fan translation patch much more comforting than anything Square-Enix have to say. In the video below, you can see the early fruits of their labours.

Of course, fan translations are nothing new in gaming, certainly when it comes to jRPGs, but I doubt many thought such a high profile game would need such a patch. The legality of such is a little shaky (as you’ll need a ROM of the game to apply the patch to – so get importing if you’re interested), so it remains to be seen whether or not Square-Enix will take any action over these efforts. We can hope not; if Square-Enix won’t allow the vast majority of the world to enjoy this highly-rated and highly-anticipated game, then at least allow fans to translate it so we can import a Japanese version and still understand what’s happening. I’d much, much rather have an official English-language release, but that doesn’t seem likely; we can hope the publicity these fans’ efforts are garnering will prove that there is sufficient demand for Type-0 outside of Japan and the company springs into action. Until then, I’ll be keeping a keen eye on this translation patch, and I shall have to content myself with ‘We Have Arrived’ on Theatrhythm.

Links:
GameSpot’s interview with Hajime Tabata:
http://uk.gamespot.com/features/fantasy-star-talking-to-final-fantasy-scenario-director-hajime-tabata-6399208/
Kotaku’s coverage of the fan-tran patch:
http://kotaku.com/5983342/square-enix-wont-release-final-fantasy-type+0-in-north-america-so-fans-are-taking-over